Iraq and the UN

27 June 2013
Security Council
SC/11050

Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Security Council

6990th Meeting (AM)


Unanimously Adopting Resolution 2107 (2013), Security Council Removes Iraq


from Chapter VII Obligations over Return of Kuwaiti Nationals


Foreign Minister Hails Text as ‘Significant Step’ in Mending Bilateral Ties


The Security Council today decided to remove Iraq from its obligations under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter concerning the return of Kuwaiti and third-State nationals or their remains and their property seized by Iraq’s former regime during its 1990 invasion of Kuwait.


Unanimously adopting resolution 2107 (2013), the 15-member body welcomed the Secretary-General’s report (document S/2013/357) on that subject and called on the Iraqi Government to give the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) any information available on the Kuwaiti and third-country nationals, and to facilitate the ICRC’s access to them and their remains, as well as the ICRC’s search for missing persons and property, including Kuwait’s national archives.


Further to the text, the Council asked the Special Representative of the Secretary-General and the Head of the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) to facilitate efforts towards that end.  It also asked the Secretary-General to consider charging his Deputy Special Representative at UNAMI covering political affairs to oversee Iraq-Kuwait issues.


Following the adoption, Hoshyar Zebar, Iraq’s Foreign Minister, said the text marked a turning point in Iraq’s relationship with the international community and a significant step in Iraq’s and Kuwait’s joint efforts to mend bilateral ties.  Further, it illustrated that Iraq had fulfilled all its obligations under Chapter VII of the Charter.


“All the negative aspects of the relationship between the countries have become part of the past.  We will focus on the present and the future, and what the brotherly relations can achieve to consolidate peace, security and stability in the region,” Mr. Zebar said.


A joint ministerial committee to maintain border markers had already been set up, he said.  Moving forward, they would work together to achieve sustainable development.  The international community’s support was needed to aid that process, as well as to help the two nations win the war on terrorism and defeat religious extremism.


The meeting began at 11:04 a.m. and ended at 11:21 a.m.


Resolution


The full text of resolution 2107 (2013) reads as follows:


The Security Council,


Recalling its relevant resolutions on the situation between Iraq and Kuwait, in particular resolutions 686 (1991), 687 (1991), 833 (1993), and 1284 (1999), and the reports of the Secretary-General pursuant to paragraph 14 of resolution 1284 (1999),


Recognizing that the situation that now exists in Iraq is significantly different from that which existed at the time of the adoption of resolution 661 (1990), and further recognizing the importance of Iraq achieving international standing equal to that which it held prior to the adoption of resolution 661 (1990),


Welcoming Iraq’s continued demonstration of its commitment to the full implementation of its outstanding obligations under the relevant Chapter VII resolutions, namely the continuation of payment of the outstanding amount of compensation administered by the United Nations Compensation Commission, and both Iraq and Kuwait’s efforts to advance regional stability, and welcoming also all the positive steps that have been taken by the Government of Iraq to fulfil resolution 833 (1993),


Welcoming further the ongoing cooperation between Iraq and Kuwait in the search for missing Kuwaiti and third-country nationals within the framework of the Tripartite Commission and its Technical Subcommittee under the auspices of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), and the positive efforts by the Government of Iraq regarding the return of all Kuwaiti and third-country nationals or their remains, and the return of Kuwaiti property,


Reiterating the need for continued efforts to locate and repatriate missing Kuwaiti property, including the national archives, through the Iraqi interministerial committee established for this purpose,


Expressing its deep appreciation to the late Ambassador Yuli Vorontsov and Ambassador Gennady Tarasov, who in the capacity of High-level Coordinator, devoted their time and professional skills to carrying out the mandate outlined in paragraph 14 of resolution 1284 (1999) and ensuring that its implementation built trust between Iraq and Kuwait and contributed to the full normalization of their relations,


Noting that the mandate of the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) includes advising, supporting, and assisting the Government of Iraq in facilitating regional dialogue,


With consideration to the provisions of Chapter VI of the Charter of the United Nations on the pacific settlement of disputes,


“1.   Welcomes the report of the Secretary-General of 17 June 2013 (S/2013/357) and the letters from the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs of the State of Kuwait (S/2013/323, annex and S/2013/324, annex) and the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Iraq (S/2013/357, annexes II and III) to the Secretary-General;


“2.   Calls upon the Government of Iraq, in furtherance of its commitment to facilitate the repatriation of all Kuwaiti and third-country nationals referred to in paragraph 30 of resolution 687 (1991), to continue cooperation with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) by providing any information of such persons, facilitating the access of ICRC to all such persons wherever they might be and facilitating the search by ICRC for those Kuwaiti and third-country nationals or their remains still unaccounted for, and to continue efforts to search for missing Kuwaiti property, including the national archives, through its interministerial committee;


“3.   Decides, under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations, to terminate the measures in paragraphs 2 (c), 2 (d) and 3 (c) of resolution 686 (1991), paragraph 30 of resolution 687 (1991) and the arrangements set forth in paragraph 14 of resolution 1284 (1999), and reaffirmed in subsequent relevant resolutions;


“4.   Requests that the Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of the United Nations Assistance Mission to Iraq (UNAMI) promote, support and facilitate efforts regarding the repatriation or return of all Kuwaiti and third-country nationals or their remains, and the return of Kuwaiti property, including the national archives, seized by Iraq, further requests the Secretary-General to report separately to the Security Council on these matters in his reports on the progress made towards the fulfilment of all UNAMI’s responsibilities, and also requests that the Secretary-General consider designating the Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General at UNAMI covering political affairs with the responsibility for overseeing these issues and ensuring appropriate resources for this purpose;


“5.   Expresses its intention to review the modalities of the reporting referred to in operative paragraph 4 of this resolution, upon the eventual termination of UNAMI’s mandate, with a view towards considering a continued role for the United Nations in such matters if needed;


“6.   Decides to remain seized of the matter.”


* *** *


For information media • not an official record
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End of Iraq Sanctions Reflects Progress Since Saddam Era, Analysts Say

By Stephen Clark

Published December 15, 2010
FoxNews.com
  • iraqbiden.jpg

    Dec. 15, 2010: U.S. Vice President Joe Biden, right, greets Iraqi Foreign Minister Hoshyar Zebari, center, before a meeting of the United Nations Security Council. At left is Hamid al-Bayati, Iraq's U.N. ambassador. (AP)

The U.N. Security Council's decision on Wednesday to lift a trio of Saddam Hussein-era sanctions against Iraq, including a ban on acquiring weapons of mass destruction, might send shivers down the spine of anyone fearful that the country could eventually fall back into the hands of another ruthless dictator.

But U.S. officials and analysts say the council's actions reflect the progress made in Iraq and, if anything, help prevent a sequel to the Saddam era.

"This basically is a recognition by the international community of the efforts and progress that has been made in Iraq up to this point to rejoin the international community and their commitment to living within the guidelines of the international community," a State Department official told FoxNews.com.

"It's a new day for Iraq," the official said. "It obviously lifts them from the many restrictions that were there under a different era."

The council lifted sanctions that have been in place since Hussein's 1990 invasion of Kuwait. Iraq will now be able to pursue a civilian nuclear program and take control of its oil and natural gas revenue on June 30, 2011. The council also terminated all remaining activities of the controversial oil-for-food program which ran from 1996-2003 and helped ordinary Iraqis cope with sanctions.

The U.S. holds the Security Council presidency this month and pressed for adoption of the three resolutions at a high-level meeting presided over by Vice President Biden, who called the actions Wednesday an important milestone for Iraq.

"The three resolutions we've passed bring an end to the burdensome remnants of the dark era of Saddam Hussein," Biden said. "In recent years, the Iraqi people have emerged from the depths of sectarian violence and they have flatly rejected the grim future offered by extremists, and they have earned themselves a chance for much better days ahead."

The U.N.'s most powerful body voted a day after a deadlock on forming a new Iraqi government ended and a year before the United States is scheduled to pull its last troops out of the country.

Marisa Cochrane, deputy director of the Institute for the Study of War and an expert on Iraq, said the presence of the U.S. forces in Iraq and its involvement in lifting the sanctions should assuage any concerns about a setback.

She noted that Iraq's constitution bars the country from acquiring weapons of mass destruction,

"I think there is a framework within Iraq that will mitigate concerns over lifting these sanctions," she said.

Iraq is also a party to the main nuclear, chemical, biological and missile treaties.

Stephen Biddle, a senior fellow for defense policy at the Council on Foreign Relations, told FoxNews.com that the intent of the council's actions is to "reduce the likelihood that Iraq return to dictatorship" by integrating Iraq into the international economic system.

He also said the original intent of the sanctions themselves was not a response to Iraq inherently being a hostile place but rather to Hussein adopting "hostile policies."

"You no longer have a Saddam Hussein threatening his neighbors," he said, adding that the sanctions are punishing policymakers for decisions they didn't make and are unlikely to make anytime soon.

The resolution approved Wednesday terminates provisions of two resolutions adopted in 1991 under Chapter 7 of the U.N. Charter -- which is militarily enforceable -- banning Iraq from using, developing, constructing or acquiring nuclear, chemical and biological weapons or material to make them and ballistic missiles with a range greater than 150 kilometers.

A second resolution, adopted unanimously, ends the international management of the Development Fund for Iraq on June 30, 2011. It was set up in 2003 to try to ensure that the proceeds of the country's gas and oil sales were used to help its people and restore its economy.

The resolution, which will end Iraq's immunity from claims on the funds after June 30, calls on Iraq to set up a successor mechanism. A U.S. official said the resolution ensures that 5 percent of oil and gas revenue will still go into a compensation fund, used mainly to pay Kuwaiti claims from the war.

Under the oil-for-food program, which ran from 1996 to 2003, Iraq was allowed to sell oil provided most of the money went to buy humanitarian goods. It was aimed at easing Iraqi suffering under U.N. sanctions and was a lifeline for 90 percent of the country's population.

But an 18-month U.N.-sanctioned investigation found massive corruption in the program. Its final report in October 2005 accused more than 2,200 companies from some 40 countries of colluding with Saddam's regime to bilk the humanitarian program of $1.8 billion.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.


Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2010/12/15/end-iraq-sanctions-reflects-progress-saddam-era-analysts-say/#ixzz2XRGp1D6z
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U.N. council brings Iraq closer to end of 1990s sanctions

UNITED NATIONS | Thu Jun 27, 2013 11:16am EDT

(Reuters) - The U.N. Security Council brought Iraq one step closer on Thursday to ending United Nations sanctions imposed on Baghdad more than two decades ago after former President Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait In 1990.

The 15-member council unanimously agreed that the issue of missing Kuwaiti people, property and archives should be dealt with under Chapter 6 of the U.N. Charter - which urges countries to peacefully resolve any conflicts - instead of Chapter 7.

Chapter 7 of the charter allows the Security Council to authorize actions ranging from sanctions to military intervention if states do not abide by council demands.

The move by the council is a significant political boost for Baghdad as it struggles to restore its international standing a decade after a U.S.-led invasion of Iraq toppled Saddam in 2003.

The Security Council resolution recognized "the importance of Iraq achieving international standing equal to that which it held prior to (1990)." U.S.-led troops drove Iraq out of Kuwait in the 1991 Gulf War.

The only issues linked to Iraq's invasion of Kuwait that remain under Chapter 7 are an arms embargo and Baghdad's payment of $52 billion in compensation to Kuwait, diplomats say. Iraq still owes $11 billion and has said it expects to pay by 2015.

There are still a range of Chapter 7 issues imposed on Baghdad after Saddam's ouster in 2003, diplomats say, including the freeze and return of Saddam-era assets and trade ban on stolen Iraqi cultural property.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has recommended that the U.N. political mission in Iraq should take responsibility for facilitating the search for missing Kuwaitis, or their remains, property and the country's national archives.

(Reporting by Michelle Nichols; Editing by Doina Chiacu)

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June 2013 Monthly Forecast     (PDF attached at the bottom of this webpage labeled 2013_06_forecast)

Posted 31 May 2013
Download Complete Forecast: PDF MS Word
MIDDLE EAST

Iraq

Expected Council Action

Council members expect to receive a briefing in consultations in June from the Department of Political Affairs on the 35th report of the Secretary-General on Iraq’s compliance with resolution 1284 (1999) regarding the repatriation or return of Kuwaiti and third country nationals or their remains and the return of Kuwaiti property, including archives that had been seized by Iraq. At press time it was unclear who specifically would brief the Council, as the funding for the High-Level Coordinator on Iraq-Kuwait issues (who previously briefed on this subject) was allowed to lapse on 31 December 2012 and no successor mechanism has yet been developed. It was also unclear whether the Council would adopt any outcome addressing such a mechanism.

Key Recent Developments

The 14 December 2012 Secretary-General’s report on resolution 1284 outlined four options for continuing the mandate previously held by the High-Level Coordinator, including:

  • appointing a new High-Level Coordinator to replace Gennady Tarasov, who retired on 31 December 2012;
  • appointing an interim coordinator;
  • folding the mandate of the Coordinator into that of the UN Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI); or
  • assigning the mandate to someone from UN headquarters.

Recent months have seen Iraq make progress on several issues stemming from its 1990 invasion of Kuwait. The Iraq-Kuwait Boundary Maintenance Project (the reactivation of which was welcomed by the Council in a 1 December 2012 press statement) was successfully completed at the end of March following the demolition of the last remaining Iraqi buildings on the border. The Boundary Maintenance Project was established in 2003 to implement the demarcation of the border as recommended by the UN Boundary Demarcation Commission but has faced repeated delays due to occasional disputes between Iraq and Kuwait regarding the border, and Iraqi unwillingness to remove objects impeding the project. Iraq and Kuwait are currently in discussions on a successor arrangement to the Boundary Maintenance Project, agreement on which would fulfil Iraq’s obligations under resolution 833 regarding the demarcation of the border.

Progress has also been made towards the compensation of those Iraqi citizens relocated from the border area with Kuwait, pursuant to resolution 899. In May, Iraq formally requested that the compensation funds (originally provided by Kuwait) be transferred to it from the UN for distribution to identified beneficiaries. On 17 May the Council approved the transfer via an exchange of letters.

The most recent report of the Secretary-General on UNAMI also detailed advances in the normalisation of relations between Iraq and Kuwait, including the resumption of Iraqi Airways flights to and from Kuwait on 27 February and a visit to Kuwait by the Special Representative of the Secretary-General, Martin Kobler, to discuss outstanding Iraq-Kuwait issues on 5 March.

On 19 May, Iraq announced that the Iraqi and Kuwaiti committees on the missing Kuwaiti national archives had agreed to meet on a regular basis. A new mission of the Tripartite Commission on Iraq-Kuwait missing persons and property (composed of Iraq, Kuwait, the US, the UK, France and Saudi Arabia) is expected to visit Iraq in June.

On the broader political and security situation in Iraq, significant violence continued in May. A wave of bombings across Iraq on 19 and 20 May killed at least 76 people and wounded more than 250. Further attacks on 26 May killed at least 53 people. News reports estimate that in May alone more than 500 people have been killed in sectarian violence in Iraq, bringing the death toll for 2013 to more than 1,500.

Human Rights-Related Developments

On 16 April, the Ministry of Justice announced the execution of 21 individuals under the 2005 anti-terrorism law. High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay condemned the execution in a 19 April press release, stressing that the justice system in the country was “too seriously flawed to warrant even a limited application of the death penalty, let alone dozens of executions at a time”. She mentioned confessions obtained under torture and ill-treatment, the lack of due process and the apparent inability of those convicted to exercise the right to seek pardon or commutation of their sentences. She also expressed her concern about the broad scope and wide application of article 4, which condones the death penalty for a range of terrorism-related acts, including some that do not meet the threshold of “most serious crimes” allowing for the imposition of the death penalty under international law. (In 2012, the number of people executed in Iraq was 129.)

Key Issues

The key issue for the Council in June remains whether or not Iraq is making sufficient progress on its current Chapter VII resolutions’ obligations and in its relations with Kuwait.

A closely related issue is the future of the mandate formerly assigned to the High-Level Coordinator and whether the Council is going to follow on any of the options outlined by the Secretary-General.

Options

The Council has several options on Iraq-Kuwait issues and the mandate of the former High-Level Coordinator in June. It could:

  • take no action, leaving the Coordinator’s mandate within the purview of the Secretariat;
  • resurrect the High-Level Coordinator position, or a similar interim position, via a press or presidential statement; or
  • fold the Coordinator’s mandate into the mandate of UNAMI.

Aside from the mandate of the High-Level Coordinator, the Council could also adopt a press statement acknowledging Iraq’s progress on its Chapter VII obligations (especially those related to the demarcation of the border, stemming from resolutions 833 and 899) or adopt a resolution formally transferring Iraq’s outstanding obligations from Chapter VII to Chapter VI (this option remains quite unlikely).

Council Dynamics

Though there appears to be a great deal of appetite on the Council for downgrading Iraq’s remaining obligations from Chapter VII to Chapter VI, most Council members are sensitive to Kuwait’s position on the matter and are waiting for explicit communication from Kuwait that it is ready to see Iraq exit Chapter VII. Kuwait has agreed in principle that Iraq could be released from its current Chapter VII obligations, but requires assurances that Iraqi progress on its obligations will continue.

The question of the mandate of the High-Level Coordinator, left unresolved in December, remains closely linked to the question of progress on Iraq’s obligations. Several Council members are quite interested in seeing that mandate folded into UNAMI, as the mission, with offices in Kuwait and Iraq, is perhaps best positioned to effectively monitor Iraq-Kuwait issues. Even so, other Council members, especially Russia, appear to be sensitive to Kuwait’s concern that as part of UNAMI, Iraq-Kuwait issues would lack the visibility they currently enjoy, effectively arresting the momentum built up in recent months.

Council members appear to be waiting for the Secretary-General’s recommendations in his June report or a clear signal from Kuwait on this issue. However, certain Council members appear worried by the precedent that might be set by allowing the Secretary-General to decide the fate of a mandate originally established by the Council.

The US is the penholder on Iraq issues in general, and the UK is the penholder on Iraq-Kuwait issues.

UN Documents on Iraq
Security Council Resolutions  
25 July 2012 S/RES/2061 The Council unanimously adopted this resolution renewing UNAMI for a further year.
17 December 1999 S/RES/1284 This resolution established UNMOVIC and requested the Secretary-General to report to the Council every four months on the compliance by Iraq with its obligations regarding the repatriation or return of all Kuwaiti and third-country nationals.
4 March 1994 S/RES/899 This resolution authorised the payment of compensation to private Iraqi citizens relocated following the demarcation of the border between Iraq and Kuwait.
27 May 1993 S/RES/833 This resolution welcomed the Secretary-General’s decision for the maintenance of the boundary until other arrangements were made by Iraq and Kuwait.
Secretary-General’s Reports  
12 March 2013 S/2013/154 This was a report of the Secretary-General on UNAMI.
14 December 2012 S/2012/931 This was a report on Iraq/Kuwait missing persons and property.
Security Council Letters  
17 May 2013 S/2013/296 This letter from the president of the Security Council approved the transfer of compensation funds to Iraq for disbursement to farmers affected by the demarcation of the border between Iraq and Kuwait.
15 May 2013 S/2013/295 This letter from the Secretary-General proposed the transfer of compensation funds to Iraq for disbursement to farmers affected by the demarcation of the border between Iraq and Kuwait.
Security Council Press Statements  
1 December 2012

UN Rep Kubler: Development of private sector in Iraq, a common goal for the Iraqi government and the UN

Posted: March 9, 2013

Screen Shot 2013-03-09 at 10.29.13 AMCounting the Secretary-General of the United Nations, Martin Kobler development of the Iraqi private sector to achieve the common goal of economic growth for the Iraqi government and the United Nations, noting that growth is facing challenges as a result of the country’s dependence on the economy one.

The deputy secretary-general of the United Nations George Posten for Kobler as saying in the first conference of businessmen in Iraq, which was held under the auspices of the office of Mr. Hakim said on Saturday that “the role of the private sector is critical to the economy of Iraq as a partner working for the development of Iraq,” noting that “the UN has attached great interest in recent years in recognition of the key role that the private sector can tell him not to economic development and the increase in the productivity of the country, but also in securing a sustainable future in the future of Iraq. “

He added, “The development of the Iraqi private sector as one of the elements to achieve economic growth in Iraq a common goal for the Iraqi government and the United Nations where both Iraq has the potential large commercial but still faces challenges due to the decades passed to the country’s dependence on the economy per rely mainly on oil revenues next the private sector is weak and has little role and lacks the incentive pay to Achieve and development of its activities and the current economy is still characterized by the dominance of the state. “

He Posten that “state-owned companies controlled on a variety of sectors managed by several ministries and suffer these companies overcrowding staff and weakness in the production and the lack of profit on the other hand dominate the private sector small and suffer from competition the government sector and foreign companies that enjoy the support of large. “

He continued by saying that ” these companies that engage in acts Almhesaraa small and medium also suffer from a lack of capital in addition to his lack of many developments and techniques technological modern but can change presence Alaqktsada Iraqi if was abandoned vision of the current economic which are subject to state control and dependence on oil and the direction and adoption economic model more diversity and sustainability in addition to the lack of private sector and even the official him to the denial of a formal structure to organize itself and make way for workers successful, which weakens the role and makes it difficult Altbu economical companies that held with companies and potential parties of government making those Alscherkat vulnerable to corruption and the absence of effective Also, the participation of women and youth in the activities is very limited because of the scarcity of opportunity to achieve these two categories to the market so it makes not to exploit human capital adequate Balkaddr “.

He Posten “I have worked UN firms Iraq during these years to Aasjat working environment conducive characterized events transparency and Amkaneph Predict Bmattiyadtha enable the private sector growth was affected similar free resource Taijaa socially and environmentally and economically and to contribute to economic diversification and sustainable development and the alleviation of stepped poverty, where we find the face particular private sector development project involving the {7} agencies of the United Nations, led by UNDP UN with close cooperation with the government and private sector partners will contribute the results pave the way for the development of the private sector in both political reform and Altdkhalalt and at the planning level and at the level of achievements limit now is a road map and start to develop small and medium -sized enterprises and work on form Mchaaraa body small to Almmsth and a mechanism to invest include Iraq’s industrial strategy “.

http://bit.ly/13LUhkI


United Nations recognizes Iraq's commitment to international resolutions

12/16/2012 12:00 am

Moon: for Iraq and Kuwait opportunity to announce a new collaboration
BAGHDAD - A follow-up morning
Confirmed the Secretary General of the United Nations Ban Ki-moon's commitment to Iraq its international obligations, but he is no longer directing the country quickly from Chapter VII. Comes at a time announced a UN that the year 2015 will see the closure of the file of compensation after commitment Baghdad all its obligations. Confirmed moon said in front of Iraq and Kuwait historic opportunity to renounce the past and move forward towards a new ad of cooperation, stressing United Nations full support normalization and coordinate their relations. considered moon in a report to the Security Council on Tuesday evening (Friday) that the next few months is a "period of confidence-building" for Iraq and Kuwait to settle outstanding issues between them, adding that he could "during the next six months that depends both sides to support the United Nations full for normalization and coordinate relations between them." and revealed the Kuwaiti Prime Minister's "Center Brief for the Iraqi Media Network," the week before last, went Iraq and Kuwait to sign agreements bilateral task between the two countries this month, saying: "I am honored to visit Iraq this month, and will send the visit an important message that that Kuwait did not have any problems with the Iraqi people, but was with the former regime has gone," he "should forget the past and embark on a wide space, and our duty to forget the past and look to the future, and there is no other way but to join forces between the two countries and the two peoples brothers. "is due to be holding talks" significant "between Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki and blessed. Regarding efforts by Baghdad in this regard, said Secretary General of the United Nations: "I believe that Iraq has shown intentions good in relation to the issue of missing persons." Regarding compensation, said Secretary General of the United Nations: "The Board of Directors of the Compensation Committee of the UN noted Iraq's commitment to fulfilling its obligations." and expressed that appreciation continued to the Government of Iraq and the Committee of Financial Experts Iraqi for their continued cooperation with the Compensation Committee.

UN votes to lift Iraq sanctions

The UN Security Council voted overwhelmingly today to end 13-year-old sanctions against Iraq and gave the United States and Britain extraordinary powers to run the country and its lucrative oil industry.

Despite misgivings by many council members, the 14-0 vote was a victory for the Bush administration, which made some last-minute concessions that opened the door to an independent, albeit limited UN role and the possibility of UN weapons inspectors returning to post-war Iraq.

The only opposition came from Syria, which left its seat empty and did not cast a vote in the 15-member council.

"The lifting of sanctions marks a momentous event for the people of Iraq," US Ambassador John Negroponte told the council after the vote. "It is time for the Iraqi people to benefit from their natural resources."

In Paris, US Secretary of State Colin Powell said, "This is a wonderful day for the people of Iraq."


Compromise to reach consensus
British Ambassador Sir Jeremy Greenstock, noting the divisiveness on Iraq, said, "The whole United Nations system will hope that
the vote which we have just taken marks a return to sustained consensus on one of the most difficult foreign policy issues we have
faced."


He was referring to the council's earlier refusal, particularly on the part of Russia, China, Germany and France, to authorize the
US-led war against Iraq that ousted the government of President Saddam Hussein. All four voted "yes".
The final compromise in the seven-page resolution was an agreement by Washington for a Security Council review within 12 months
on the implementation of the resolution. But the measure does not need to be renewed and stays in effect until an internationally
recognized Iraqi government is established.


French Ambassador Jean-Marc de la Sabliere said while the resolution was "not perfect", it provided "a credible framework within
which the international community will be able to lend support for the Iraqi people. This is why we supported it."
And Germany's UN ambassador, Gunter Pleuger, said bluntly: "This resolution is a compromise."
"It does not fulfill every wish of all parties, but as compared to the initial draft of the co-sponsors, we have achieved substantial
improvements," he said.


Resolution gives power to US

The UN sanctions were imposed a few days after Iraq's 1990 invasion of Kuwait. But after Saddam's fall, the United States argued
there was no reason for the trade and financial embargoes to continue.
The resolution would give the United States and Britain broad powers to run Iraq and sell its oil to fund reconstruction. It would also
protect Iraq against lawsuits or attachments of its oil revenues until a permanent Iraqi government is established.


Weapons inspectors
The United States signalled its willingness this week to have inspectors from the Vienna-based International Atomic Energy Agency,
responsible for nuclear materials, return to Iraq.
But the Bush administration is not eager for the return of chemical, biological and missile inspectors, commanded by Hans Blix, who
has openly challenged some US assertions.


Britain, however, appeared to disagree.
Greenstock in his speech said among the issues the Security Council would need to take up in "due time" was the future of the
inspection commissions "as they relate to the complete disarmament of Iraq under previous resolutions."
Before the war, US President George W Bush repeatedly accused Iraq of having illicit weapons of mass destruction and said it would
have to be disarmed by force. US teams searching for the dangerous weapons have not yet found them.




Ban Ki-moon: Iraq, Kuwait lack mutual trust because Iraq has failed to fulfill all obligations; Iraq must step up

11.17.2012 |

Still the columns between the border despite agreement in this regard
Ki-moon: Iraq has failed to fulfill its obligations remaining obligations to Kuwait

Amiri decree to drop lawsuits against Iraqi Airways is a positive development , said UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon despite the marked improvement in relations between Kuwait and Iraq, But what it lacks mutual trust between the two countries, because Iraq has failed to fulfill its obligations Altbakah of Chapter VII obligations to Kuwait, also said the Iraqi government did not remove the columns overlapping between the borders of the two countries despite the agreement earlier this regard.

pointed Ki-moon in the report League which was followed by the Security Council last night that Prince authentication Convention on the fall lawsuits brought by Kuwait on the Iraqi Airways is a positive development.

Secretary General of the United Nations Ban Ki-moon said decree Amir issued on the twenty-third of October last «positive development» as ratified the Convention fall lawsuits set up by Kuwait against Iraqi Airways. came in the periodic report that followed that of the Security Council last night on the work of Mission United Nations to help Iraq (UNAMI), saying «there a historic opportunity to Iraq and Kuwait to normalize their relations and an opportunity for Iraq to complete the remaining obligations under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations».

continued, saying «I urge the two sides to continue their efforts will of good and commitment to hard to build on the progress which أنجزاه so far and for the implementation of the agreements they reached ». vowed to spare Mission (UNAMI) effort in order to continue to work with both sides in order to support this important progress and maintain it.

failure and said Secretary General of the United Nations, said he on «Despite a marked improvement in relations between Iraq and Kuwait in the beginning of this year, they still detract mutual trust between the two sides because Iraq has failed to fulfill its obligations remaining from Chapter VII obligations to Kuwait ».

stressed that the United Nations has completed the first of last October at the request of the governments of the two countries the process of securing (maintenance project marks border between Iraq and Kuwait) pursuant to Security Council resolution No. 833 of 1993.

at the same time confirmed the Secretary General of the United Nations that «the Iraqi government did not remove the columns obstructing overlapping between the borders of the two countries despite the agreement earlier this regard».

added «as well as to the date the present did not respond to the Government of Iraq to the UN proposal to transfer amounts of compensation to Iraqi citizens pursuant to Security Council resolution No. 899 issued in 1994».

As regards the work coordinated international high-level COM and Kuwaiti property Gennady Tarasov on re prisoners and missing Kuwaitis and non-Kuwaitis or their remains confirmed the continuation of efforts to achieve this goal with the concerned officials in both countries.

and Syrian crisis worsening appealed the Secretary General of the United Nations Baghdad opened its borders to Syrian refugees pledging support for the shelter on its soil.

At the level of the political situation in Iraq Ban expressed concern about the escalation of tensions between the political leaders there, between Baghdad and Iraqi Kurdistan about «prevents progress in important future issues of Iraq. Watan

http://bit.ly/UNNE8u



UN Ambassador will report to UNSC Iraq continued commitment, readiness to be removed from CH VII

Coordinator of missing Kuwaitis: We seek to remove the file from the international framework and Iraq from Chapter VII

11/20/2012

said Kuwaitis Ambassador Gennady Tarasov it would refer in his report to the Security Council shortly to Iraq’s commitment to cooperation in the file at the same time, it seeks to remove from the international framework in order to remove Iraq from Chapter VII.

Human Rights Minister Mohamed sheyaa in a statement issued on the sidelines of the meeting missing Ambassador Gennady Tarasov, alsumaria news “got”, that “Iraq is committed to continuing cooperation with Kuwait and end the file of Kuwaiti missing persons through the positive atmosphere in investment relations between the two countries.”

Sudan stressed that “the time has come to take out Iraq from Chapter VII and subject assignment file missing from international bilateral cooperation framework under the supervision of a third party,” he said, adding that “the Kuwaiti side expressed during meetings of the Joint Ministerial Committee agreed on a United Nations resolution come out this file from international bilateral cooperation framework”.

Meanwhile, Ambassador Tarasov “inform the members of the Security Council in his report Iraq’s commitment to continue to cooperate in the file of Kuwaiti missing persons, at the same time pointing out that” the Iraqi Government’s point of view will be referred to the international framework in order to remove Iraq from Chapter VII “.

The President of the Republic Presidency Naseer Al-Ani, (September 4, 2012), that the Iraqi people aspire to remove obstacles in restoring relations with Kuwait, the Kuwaiti Ambassador to Baghdad to secure a major breakthrough in bilateral relations, adding that accelerating the resolution of some outstanding files especially missing Kuwaitis and Kuwaiti archives.

Iraqi-Kuwaiti relations have seen in past months positive developments as Kuwait’s Ambassador to Iraq to the believer (April 30, 2012), that his country will open consulates in the cities of Arbil and Basra, as well as the Embassy’s offices in a number of provinces, and confirmed that the Kuwaiti side that touches the seriousness of the Iraqi Government to close the files between the two countries since the 1990s.

As a result of improved relations with Iraq Kuwait agreed to throw his for Kuwait Airways to create joint air your stepping value of compensation, which amounted to some 300 million dollars, Kuwait also operate flights to Iraq, landed at Najaf Airport (April 17, 2012), first Kuwaiti aircraft after 22 years on another trip to Iraq, with the company (aviation) would be two weekly flights to the airport were to increase, as well as other flights to other airports in The country.

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Time to remove Iraq from CH VII, Iraq is committed to cooperate with Kuwait; UN’s Ban Ki-moon expected in Baghdad

Iraq’s Minister of Human Rights confirmed during a meeting Msala internationally need to remove Iraq from Chapter VII
11/20/2012 – 2:36 pm

Search and Human Rights Minister Mohamed Sudanese Xiaa with a high-level international coordinator for missing Kuwaiti Ambassador Gennady Tarasov bilateral relations between the two countries during a meeting at the ministry.

A statement from the Ministry today that “Minister Sudanese confirmed Iraq’s commitment to continue cooperation with Kuwait and the International Organization for ending file missing Kuwaitis by investing the positive atmosphere that prevails relations between Iraq and Kuwait, as well as the upcoming visit of the Secretary-General of the United Nations Ban Ki-moon to Baghdad.”

He added that “the time has come to remove Iraq from Chapter VII, and referral of missing Kuwaitis from its international bilateral cooperation under the supervision of a third party”, adding that “the Kuwaiti side expressed during the meetings of the Joint Ministerial Committee agreed to issue United Nations of any decision out this file of international framework to bilateral cooperation. “

For his part, praised Tarasov, according to the statement “the great efforts made by the Ministry of Human Rights and its cooperation in the search for the remains of missing Kuwaitis and which come within the framework of the efforts of the Iraqi government to end this file, also praised the positive development of the bilateral relations between Iraq and Kuwait.”

The statement continued, “Tarasov pledged that he will be members of the UN Security Council in his report Iraq’s commitment to continue cooperation in the file of missing Kuwaitis, also convey the point of view of the Iraqi government to refer the file from its international framework as a prelude to remove Iraq from Chapter VII.”

The United Nations Mission in Iraq [UNAMI] has announced the approval of Kuwait invest Taweidadtha in Iraq, and the Head of Mission Martin Kobler said in a press statement that “Kuwait agrees to transfer a large part of the compensation to the investment in Basra and a number of provinces.”

Ties Iraqi – Kuwaiti described as positive development over the past few months, to end the outstanding issues between the two countries, and to remove Iraq from international sanctions imposed on it in the seventh item, before the UN Security Council.

The latest developments announced two countries to end the row and the final settlement of the issue of Iraqi Airways, said after Emir of Kuwait Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Sabah on 23 October last Emiri Decree approving the financial settlement, after the two sides signed a final settlement by the Iraq to pay $ 500 million in compensation final to Kuwait Airways.

And consists of Chapter VII of the 13 articles, and is resolution 678 issued in 1990 calling for the ousting Iraq from Kuwait by force, from the provisions of this chapter, Iraq is still under Tailth, because the survival of several issues outstanding, such as the remains of Kuwaiti citizens and prisoners in Iraq, and Kuwaiti property, including the archives of the Amiri Diwan, and the Crown Prince Court, and the issue of compensation and environmental oil, which is not only related to the State of Kuwait, but other Arab countries, and companies claim that they do not still have some rights

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Sept. 23rd

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Kuwait’s Prime Minister HH Sheikh Jaber Al-Mubarak Al-Sabah with UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon.
‘UN working with Iraq, Kuwait to end hurdles’ ‘Chapter VII’ bone of contention

UNITED NATIONS, Sept 23, (KUNA): Representative of HH the Amir of Kuwait Sheikh Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah, HH the Prime Minister Sheikh Jaber Al-Mubarak Al-Hamad Al-Sabah and the accompanying high-level delegation began diplomatic activities on Saturday on the margins of the General Assembly’s yearly debate.

HH the Prime Minister Sheikh Jaber Al-Mubarak met Secretary General Ban Ki-moon on Sunday to discuss Kuwait’s active role in the Organisation, as well as other regional and international issues.
Kuwaiti Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister Sheikh Sabah Al-Khaled Al-Hamad Al-Sabah, member of the high-level delegation to the work of the Assembly, met on Saturday with his Omani counterpart Yousuf Bin Alawi Bin Abdullah to discuss bilateral, regional and international issues of common interest.

Sheikh Sabah Al-Khaled also had an “intensive” meeting with Martin Kobler, the UN Special Representative and Head of the UN Assistance Mission in Iraq (UNAMI).

In a statement to KUNA and Kuwait TV, Kobler said he had the opportunity to meet with Sheikh Sabah Al-Khaled in the past and that they are in “regular contact.” “The week where the Prime and Foreign Ministers are here in New York, it is very important to bring the Kuwaiti-Iraqi file ahead,” he said following the meeting.

Asked what “new arrangements” both countries are exploring to tighten their cooperation, as suggested by the Secretary General in his latest report, Kobler said that it is the joint Kuwaiti-Iraqi Committees which are dealing with this issue.

Relations
He added that HH the Amir’s “historic” visit to Baghdad earlier this year to attend the Arab League Summit “gave the whole file of the Kuwaiti-Iraqi relations a push. And I am very happy about this.” He said “the UN has a mandate to take care of the whole Chapter VII issues, which is a problem for the Iraqis. They want to get out of Chapter VII, and the only way out is to fulfil its obligations, and that’s what we are working on together with the Kuwaiti and Iraqi side.” “I am very happy that there is such a dense interaction in terms of Committees, working group meetings and also high-ranking visitors from both sides,” he stressed.

On whether he is ready to include under UNAMI’s mandate the job of the UN High-Level Coordinator for Kuwaiti missing persons and property Gennady Tarasov after he leaves office later this year, Kobler said it is up to the Security Council to decide.

Kuwait recently suggested to the UN to appoint a UN high-level representative to deal with all outstanding Kuwaiti-Iraqi issues once Tarasov is gone.

“It is not up to me to decide, because Chapter VII issues are matters of the Security Council, so it is the Security Council to decide what happens, whether the provisions were fulfilled, how the progress is, they will evaluate the Secretary General’s reports,” he explained.

He said Tarasov’s mandate is continuing until the end of the year and the Council members will have to discuss what will happen after that.

Asked if Iraq is on the right track fulfilling all its obligations, he said that after the “historic” exchange of visits between the leaders of the two countries, “I am confident that we can keep the dynamic in order to overcome the burden and to progress on the missing persons, on the border questions, and I am confident that we are going to manage, the Kuwaiti government is going to manage with the political goodwill and also the Iraqi side.”

http://www.arabtimesonline.com/RSS/tabid/69/smid/414/ArticleID/188199/Default.aspx



UNSC Report on Iraq: July 2012

Posted: July 18, 2012

JULY 2012
IRAQ

Expected Council Action
The Council is due to receive the Secretary-General’s report on the UN Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) and a briefing on its contents and developments in the country from Martin Kobler, Special Representative of the Secretary-General and head of UNAMI.

The Council seems likely to extend the mandate of UNAMI, which expires on 28 July.

The Council also expects the second report of the Secretary-General on the post-Development Fund for Iraq (DFI) mechanism. At press time it was unclear whether the Council would consider the report in July.

Key Recent Developments
A number of notable political developments continued to highlight divisions amongst Iraq’s political elite. On 30 April, the Higher Judicial Council (HJC) brought further charges against Vice-President Tariq al-Hashemi in the killing of six judges. On 8 May, Interpol issued a Red Notice alert for the arrest of al-Hashemi, who was in Istanbul at the time. (An Interpol Red Notice seeks the arrest or provisional arrest of wanted persons with a view to extradition.) On 11 May, Turkish President Abdullah Gül said in response to a press question that al-Hashemi was receiving medical treatment in Turkey. On 15 May, a trial in absentia commenced, with al-Hashemi continuing to deny the allegedly politically motivated charges against him.

On 13 April, Faraj al-Haidari, head of the Independent High Electoral Commission (IHEC), was detained on suspicion of misusing state funds, according to a statement released by the HJC. Commenting on the arrest, Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr said in a 14 April press statement that Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki was “seeking to postpone or cancel the election.” (Al-Maliki has been repeatedly accused of seeking to consolidate control over the IHEC, whose independence is viewed as essential in ensuring that the provincial elections early next year and parliamentary elections in 2014 are free and fair.)

On 28 April, senior Iraqi politicians met in Arbil, including President Jalal Talabani; Speaker of Parliament Osama al-Nujaifi; Massud Barzani, President of the autonomous Kurdistan region; Iyad Allawi, head of the Sunni-backed Iraqiya bloc; and al-Sadr. In a statement, the leaders called for “mechanisms that can solve the instability” and highlighted “the necessity of looking into solutions to end the (political) crisis.”

On 2 June, Deputy Prime Minister Saleh al-Mutlak said in a statement that “Maliki staying on as prime minister will expose national unity to danger and will lead to the division of the country.”

Kobler encouraged all parties to engage in inclusive dialogue following a meeting with Talabani and Barzani on 13 June.

Violent incidents continued to mar Iraq’s security. Reportedly a total of 132 Iraqis died and a further 248 were wounded in attacks in May. Moreover, by 18 June, a series of bombings and attacks across Iraq had reportedly resulted in at least 135 deaths and more than 500 injured.

On the issue of Camp Ashraf, in an 11 June UNAMI statement, Kobler “urged the remaining residents of Camp Ashraf to relocate to Camp Hurriya without delay.” (Camp Ashraf, situated in Diyala province, once housed more than 3,000 Iranian exiles belonging to the Mujahedin-e Khalq Iran [MEK], an organisation opposed to the government in Tehran and also on the US terrorist list. Some two-thirds of the residents moved to the new camp after UNAMI signed a memorandum of understanding with the government of Iraq on 25 December 2011. However, the MEK has reportedly halted its transfer of the remaining residents and has reduced contact with the Iraqi government and the UN.)

Gennady Tarasov, the High-Level Coordinator for Iraq-Kuwait missing persons and property, briefed Council members in consultations on the latest report of the Secretary-General (S/2012/443) on 19 June. Council members released a press statement (SC/10680) the next day stating they were “encouraged by the recent positive developments in Iraqi-Kuwaiti bilateral relations.” Council members also supported the Secretary-General’s opinion that both sides should begin exploring other arrangements on Iraq-Kuwait issues. The financing of the high-level coordinator was renewed for another six months.

Human Rights-Related Developments
According to a joint report published on 30 May by the Human Rights Office of UNAMI and the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, “the human rights situation in Iraq remains fragile as the country continues its transition from years of dictatorship, conflict and violence to peace and democracy.” Commenting on the report, Kobler added that it “highlights a number of shortcomings, some of which are of serious concern and need to be urgently addressed by the Iraqi authorities. There is no democracy without respect for human rights.”

Key Issues
The key issue for the Council is to determine UNAMI’s contribution towards the stability of Iraq.

Another key issue for the Council is the ongoing high level of sectarian violence in the aftermath of the arrest warrant issued for al-Hashemi.

A closely related issue is the extent to which UNAMI can be helpful in mitigating this situation.

A further issue for the Council is whether the post-DFI mechanism is functioning in a satisfactory fashion.

Underlying Problems
Different political blocs remain divided over power-sharing, with key ministerial posts, such as defence and interior, being vacant for months.

Options
On UNAMI, the Council could renew the mandate without substantial changes to its scope or composition. The Council could also address Iraq’s political situation in the same resolution, including some or all of the following elements:

expressing concern about the impact of violence on Iraqi civilians;
urging Iraq’s political leaders to resolve differences through political dialogue; and
urging Iraq to finalise the formation of its government by filling all vacant ministerial posts based on inclusiveness.
On the post-DFI issues the Council could take no action at present while continuing to monitor the progress of the post-DFI mechanism until the audit is conducted. (The Secretary-General’s report [S/2011/795] notes the appointment of the firm Ernst & Young to conduct the 2011 audit of the DFI and its successor account.)

Council and Wider Dynamics
Most Council members continue to view Iraq as a routine issue. Some Council members feel that the current mandate of UNAMI is peripheral and that, as a political mission, it should be more focused on mitigating Iraq’s domestic political impasse and the ensuing violence. These members feel that there remains a serious threat to Iraq’s overall stability under the current volatile political and security climate. However, other members do not view the surge in violence following the US withdrawal as particularly abnormal.

The US is the lead country on Iraq issues in general, and the UK is the lead on Iraq-Kuwait issues.

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This is a clip of text in the "International Compact With Iraq" that lays out their economic reform measures that are sure to usher in a revaluation of their currency.  The whole document is attached at the bottom of the page...

4.3 Economic Reform
Goal: Create an enabling environment for investment, public and private, domestic and foreign, as a driver for sustainable and diversified economic growth and job creation; create the conditions for maximising the benefits from foreign aid and investment and integration into the global economies
4.3.1 Reforming Subsidies
The Government shall work to phase out inefficient and inequitable universal subsidy programs while ensuring the protection of the vulnerable. This will involve
• Bringing all subsidies on budget in a way that reflects their full costs;
• Developing a programme for the transition from universal subsidies to targeted safety nets which will be efficient, equitable, provide adequate protection to the poor and vulnerable;
• Conducting public education and consultation to ensure broad participation and buy-in for subsidy reforms
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Fuel subsidies shall be phased out according to the SBA in tandem with social safety net development and other compensation mechanisms.
The Public Distribution System (PDS) will be rationalised and transitioned to targeting in tandem with the development of a comprehensive social safety net. PDS Reforms will also take consideration of agricultural policies and impact on other sectors.
The Government of Iraq recognizes the need to reform the PDS in order to improve the efficiency and equity of public resource allocation, but it also appreciates its obligation to support the 25% of Iraqi households which are heavily dependent upon the system. The PDS will therefore be replaced with various social service, income, and employment programs which particularly target those individuals without access to the labour market. In this context the Government will discuss with the IMF the introduction of a petroleum dividend as part of the compensation framework for the withdrawn subsidies.
4.3.2 Private Sector Development and Investment promotion
Goal: Create an enabling environment for private investment and job creation
• Enhance the rule of law in commercial and financial activities.
o The judicial system and the legal capabilities in this field will be developed to ensure the protection of private property and the sanctity of contract
o Investment Law will be implemented and a new Commercial Code will be passed and implemented
• Improve the ease of starting and exiting a business, employing workers, registering property, getting credit, dealing with licenses, trading across borders and enforcing contracts with due attention to equality issues and opportunities;
• Formulate a strategy for restructuring, commercializing and privatizing SOEs including the establishment of a State Property Fund to manage state property on a commercial basis and attract investors. Encourage entrepreneurship and commercial spin-offs within SOEs;
• Find private sector-based solutions to stimulate housing development;
• Improve availability of financing to private entrepreneurs, particularly to SMEs including credit guarantees, concessionary financing including micro and SME specific packages;
• Include provisions for the encouragement of private sector in public procurement legislation and regulations;
• Join OECD-MENA and participate in their programs for private sector development and investment promotion.
In addition to security, rule of law and an efficient and predictable regulatory regime, the state needs to provide other public goods essential for the development of a vibrant private sector including energy, basic services, major infrastructure and improvements in human capital through training and education. Strategies and actions in all these areas could be formulated within the context of the Action Plan for Growth (see 6.5. below)
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4.3.3 Financial Sector Restructuring
Goal: Promote public savings and investment and to create an environment for investment and growth the Government shall continue its effort at reforming the Financial Sector.
• Restructuring state owned banks;
• Creating conditions for the strengthening of Iraq’s financial system and increasing access to credit by businesses and individuals;
• Creating an enabling environment for competition and for the growth of private banking, restructuring and consolidation of private banks, and for levelling the playing filed in the banking system overall
• Facilitate the participation though private banks in government payments accounts such as payroll and pensions;
• Expand the electronic payment system
4.3.4 Regional and International Economic Integration
Substantial hurdles must be overcome in order for Iraq to rejoin the global economy – not the least of which being its large international debts and obligations. The Compact seeks to resolve those and other outstanding issues in relation to international economic partners.
Iraq will pursue membership in international trade, cooperation and environmental treaties and organizations for the benefit of the Iraqi economy and the welfare of its people. For this to happen it is necessary to:
• Factor regional and international integration into economic policy including tax and customs policies, regulations of trade, finance, services, public procurement, quality standards, intellectual property and investment
• Build capacity across Ministries to negotiate and implement international treaties and agreements
• Pass legislation and undertake other measures necessary to facilitate implementation and active participation in international treaties and organizations
• Review the accession to existing International Conventions/Treaties/Protocols: ensure progress on signing/ratifying and reporting obligations
Iraq will work toward participating in the following treaties and agreements:
• Continue to engage actively with the UN, the IMF and the World Bank
• Participate actively in regional organizations such as the OPEC, Islamic Development Bank, Arab Fund for Economic and Social Development. Pursue closer relations and consider accession to the GCC.
• Work closely with the EU including through the Trade and Cooperation Agreement.
• Work to gain membership in the World Trade Organization and explore bilateral and multilateral free trade agreements consistent with WTO membership
• Join the UN Anti-Corruption Convention and MENA-FATF. Sign up to the EITI Principles.
• Join environmental treaties such as the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and its Kyoto Protocol, the Convention on Biodiversity, the Wetlands Convention and the Convention to Combat Desertification. Ensure access to
17
capacity building and compensation mechanisms available to developing countries for the implementation of environmental treaties such as the Global Environmental Facility and the Clean Development Mechanism.
Iraq will also develop mechanisms for working with recognized non-governmental institutions and business organizations (such as Chambers of Commerce) that can help facilitate international integration on favourable terms.

Washington confirms it is aiding Iraq out of Chapter VII; Resolving differences between Iraq and Kuwait

Washington: US Iraq out of Chapter VII-VI

Tuesday 30 1 2012 15: 54 GMT

The United States, confirmed Tuesday, they work out Iraq from Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations chapter VI, noting it has worked to resolve differences between Iraq and Kuwait.

The US Ambassador in Iraq, Stephen bikroft told the media, “NPR.org, that” the United States has worked hard behind the scenes with Iraq and Kuwait for settlement differences “, stating that” our office in United Nations working to finish the requirements of Chapter VII. “

Bikroft added that “there are reviews every six months and we hope that Chapter VII becomes chapter VI,” the United States strongly interact with the Iraqi Government in this field and are working to support them as much as possible. “

The Iraqi Foreign Ministry announced, (23 October 2012), Emir of the State of Kuwait has agreed to settle the issue of compensation to Kuwait Airways caused by edema, Iraq asserted that Kuwait informed law firms in Britain to stop all actions on airlines and property.

Iraqi-Kuwaiti relations have seen recent progress in resolving some outstanding issues, as agreed during the visit of Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki to Kuwait on 14 March last, to end the issue of compensation for KAC and maintenance of boundary markers, as agreed foundations and common frameworks to resolve all files, within short time frames, with Foreign Minister Hoshyar Zebari, who accompanied Al-Maliki to visit that what has been agreed is substantial progress with regard to Iraq out of Chapter VII.

Kuwait has demanded since Iraq’s invasion in 1990 to pay $ 1.2 billion as compensation for seizing 17 aircraft owned by Kuwait Airways, this file to political problems between Iraq and Kuwait following the recent lawsuits against Iraqi Airways for frozen in Jordan and Britain early in 2010, which led later to take the Iraqi Council of Ministers adopted a resolution in May of the same year, filters and cancel the company and offered for sale to eligible companies, also decided to cancel all administrative profiles Associated with maintaining cadre after sale to a private company.

The Iraq since 1990 under Chapter VII of the UN Charter imposed after the invasion of Saddam Hussein’s regime State Kuwait in August of the same year, this item allows the use of force against Iraq as a threat to international security, in addition to freeze large amounts of stock in international banks to pay compensation to those affected by the invasion

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***At the bottom of this page I have attached the 79 different resolutions that were used in the chapter seven restrictions against Iraq!

United nations Chapter VII Chronological Events...


"Today, despite the best efforts of the international community and the United Nations, war has come to Iraq for the third time in a quarter of a century," he said.

"Perhaps if we had persevered a little longer, Iraq could yet have been disarmed peacefully or – if not – the world could have taken action to solve this problem by a collective decision, endowing it with greater legitimacy, and therefore commanding wider support, than is now the case.

But let us not dwell on the divisions of the past. Let us confront the realities of the present, however harsh, and look for ways to forge stronger unity in the future."

The Secretary-General noted that he was aware that these measures would lead to the suspension of the activities of the humanitarian programme in Iraq pursuant to resolution 986 (1995). However, the threat to the safety and security of the personnel concerned had in effect rendered their mandates inoperable.

The Secretary-General stated, for the record, that he regards those activities as suspended de facto. The mandates established by the relevant Security Council resolutions under which these activities are carried out remain in force until such time as the Security Council should decide otherwise.

All remaining UN international staff in Iraq were evacuated on 18 March 2003.



2 August 1990:
Iraqi forces invade Kuwait. On the same day, the Security Council adopts Resolution 660 and condemns the invasion.

6 August 1990: Resolution 661 is adopted by the Security Council which imposes sanctions on both Iraq and occupied Kuwait; and establishes the 661 Committee to implement the Resolution.

20 March 1991: A report (S/22366) by Under Secretary-General Martti Ahtisaari warns of imminent catastrophe if massive life-supporting needs are not met.

3 April 1991: The Security Council, in resolution 687, sets terms for a cease-fire - disarmament and removal of Iraq's capacity to develop weapons of mass destruction.

May 1991:The UN Inter-Agency Humanitarian Programme is established to meet immediate needs of vulnerable Iraqis. Funding totals $964 million from 1991 to 1996.

15 August 1991: The Security Council adopts resolution 706 offering an opportunity for Iraqi oil to be sold and the revenue used to purchase essential humanitarian supplies. This resolution is not accepted by the Government of Iraq.

14 April 1995: Resolution 986 is adopted by the Security Council. Iraq subsequently refuses to accept its terms.

20 May 1996: Following extensive negotiations, a Memorandum of Understanding is signed between the Government of Iraq and the United Nations Secretariat regarding the implementation of resolution 986.

20 August 1996: Gultiero Fulcheri (Italy) is appointed the United Nations Humanitarian Coordinator in Iraq. He succeeds Mohammed Zejjari (Algeria).

25 November 1996: The interim report of the Secretary-General on the implementation of Security Council resolution 986 (1995) is issued S/1996/978.

10 December 1996: Following the Secretary-General's report to the Council that all measures are in place for the implementation of resolution 986 (1995), phase I officially begins with the pumping of Iraqi oil for export. The first proceeds from the sale of oil are deposited in the United Nations Iraq Account (Escrow Account), at the Banque Nationale de Paris in New York on 15 January 1997.

20 February 1997: Steffan de Mistura (Sweden) assumes his functions as the United Nations Humanitarian Coordinator in Iraq, replacing Gulttiero Fulcheri.

10 March 1997: The Secretary-General's 90-day report on phase I is issued (S/1997/206).

20 March 1997: The first shipment of supplies under phase I is cleared at the Habur/Zakho crossing point. In April, the distribution of wheat flour begins throughout the country.

2 June 1997: The Secretary-General's 180-day report on phase I is issued (S/1997/419).

4 June 1997: The Security Council adopts resolution 1111, extending the Programme for another six months beginning on 8 June.

8 June 1997: Phase II officially begins. However, the Iraqi Government announces that oil will not be pumped under this phase until a new distribution plan is approved by the Secretary-General.

4 August 1997: The Secretary-General approves the distribution plan for phase II (S/1997/606).

14 August 1997: Iraqi oil flow under phase II begins. The two-month delay in the pumping of oil creates a potential shortfall in revenues, estimated at $500 million. On 12 September, the Security Council adoptsresolution 1129. It grants Iraq an additional period of 30 days to sell oil to reach the target of $1 billion for the first half of phase II.

3 September 1997: Denis Halliday (Ireland) takes over from Steffan de Mistura as the United Nations Humanitarian Coordinator in Iraq, succeeding.

8 September 1997: The Secretary-General's 90-day report on phase II is issued (S/1997/685).

13 October 1997: The Secretary-General establishes the Office of the Iraq Programme (OIP), effective 15 October 1997, to consolidate and manage the activities of the Secretariat in implementing the oil-for-food programme. Benon V. Sevan (Cyprus) is appointed as Executive Director of the Office of the Iraq Programme.

4 December 1997: The Security Council adopts resolution 1143, extending the Programme for another six months. It also requests the Secretary-General to submit a supplementary report, reviewing humanitarian needs, and expresses its willingness to authorize "additional resources".

5 December 1997: Phase III officially begins. The Iraqi Government announces that pumping of oil under phase III will not flow into the pipeline until the distribution plan is approved by the Secretary-General.

5 January 1998: The Secretary-General approves distribution plan for phase III (S/1998/4).

1 February 1998: The Secretary-General's Supplementary Report (S/1998/90) offers proposals to improve the process of contract approval and delivery. The report proposes to raise the ceiling of oil sales every six months (per phase) from $2 billion to $5.2 billion gross ($3.4 billion net for the humanitarian allocation).

19 February 1998: Security concerns lead to a relocation of staff and partial suspension of activities in central/southern Iraq.

20 February 1998: The Security Council adopts resolution 1153 authorising the increase in the Programme and requests that the Secretary-General appoint a group of oil experts to look into Iraq's oil producing capacity and the need for spare parts and equipment.

20-23 February 1998: Secretary-General Kofi Annan travels to Baghdad to defuse the growing political crisis with the Government of Iraq on the issue of UN weapons inspections.

26 February 1998: Most UN personnel relocated to Amman and Erbil return to Baghdad.

15 April 1998: The Secretary-General transmits the report of the group of oil industry experts who note the lamentable state of Iraq's oil industry and recommend the provision of equipment and spare parts to increase Iraq's ability to export oil.

29 May 1998: The Secretary-General approves the enhanced distribution plan (S/1998/446), based on a net humanitarian allocation of $3.1 billion (from a projected $4.8 billion in gross oil sales), more than doubling the Programme.

21 June - 5 July 1998: OIP Executive Director Benon V. Sevan visits Iraq. He holds meetings with Iraqi government officials and heads of United Nations agencies on ways to improve the implementation performance of the Programme.

19 June 1998: The Security Council adopts resolution 1175 authorizing Iraq to import up to $300 million worth of oil industry spare parts and equipment in order increase production of oil for export.

4 September 1998: The Secretary-General's 90-day report is presented to the Security Council. The report estimates a total oil revenue of $2.86 billion. This is later revised to $3.3 billion, providing a humanitarian allocation of $2.1 billion - one billion less than what was needed to fund the enhanced distribution plan.

28 September 1998: Secretary-General Kofi Annan appoints Hans von Sponeck, a German national, to the post of United Nations Humanitarian Coordinator in Iraq.

October 1998: OIP Executive Director meets with Iraq's Foreign Minister Mohammed Al Sayaf in New York and discusses the need to prioritize funding of contracts given the expected shortfall in oil revenues. Mr Sevan writes to the Chairman of the 661 Committee and later briefs the Committee on issues related to prioritizing and repeats his concerns on the slow approvals for oil spare parts and equipment.

11 November 1998: Following the withdrawal of UNSCOM and mounting security concerns, UN Security Coordinator decides to redeploy temporarily UN personnel based in Baghdad to Amman, Jordan.

14 November 1998: UN personnel, temporarily redeployed to Amman, return to Baghdad.

19 November 1998: The Secretary-General's 180-day report on phase IV is issued.

24 November 1998: The Security Council adoptsresolution 1210 extending the Programme for another 180 days (phase V) as of 26 November.

11 December 1998: The Secretary-General approves distribution plan for phase V (S/1998/1158), submitted by the Government of Iraq, based on a net humanitarian allocation of $2.746 billion.

16 December 1998: Military action by the the United States and United Kingdom begins against Iraq. United Nations staff are not evacuated at first and remain restricted to the UN office through two nights of bombing. On 18 December, the United Nations temporarily relocates most staff to Amman, Jordan.

20 December 1998: Military operations cease. United Nations staff begin to return to Baghdad on 22 December.

29 December 1998: The Secretary-General informs the Security Council on the state of Iraq's oil industry and transmits the report of a group of oil experts sent to Iraq earlier in the month.

4 January 1999: OIP is advised by the Government of Iraq that it is unable to ensure the security of United States and United Kingdom nationals serving with the Organization in Iraq. On 3 February, the United Nations withdraws all US and UK nationals working in Iraq.

30 January 1999: Following a proposal by Canada, the Security Council establishes three separate panels on disarmament, humanitarian situation and prisoners of war and Kuwaiti missing persons and archives. The Panels are chaired by Ambassador Celso Amorim (Brazil).

25 February 1999: OIP Executive Director presents the Secretary-General's 90-day report on the implementation of phase V to the Security Council and emphasises the consequences of the shortfall in oil revenues. He calls for "bold, imaginative and pragmatic" approaches to investment in Iraq's oil industry to increase revenues.

3 March 1999: Briefing to the Security Council by Mr Benon V. Sevan, Executive Director of the Office of the Iraq Programme.

18 March 1999: OIP Executive Director Benon V. Sevan in a letter to the Security Council's 661 Committee details the consequences of revenue shortfalls for the oil for food programme.

7 April 1999: Ambassador Celso Amorim (Brazil) presents the reports of the three panels established by the Security Council on Iraq in January 1999, including the report of the humanitarian panel.

15 April 1999: The Secretary-General transmits to the Security Council the report of the oil industry experts on the state of Iraq's oil industry and its capacity to increase production and exports of oil.

28 April 1999: The review and assessment report on the implementation of the Programme covering the period December 1996 - November 1998 is submitted to the Security Council.

13 May 1999: The Secretary-General approves the inclusion of a new sector in the distribution plan - telecommunications.

21 May 1999: The Security Council adopts resolution 1242, extending the Programme for another 180 days as of 25 May 1999 (phase VI).

21 May 1999: OIP Executive Director presents the Secretary-General's 180-day report on phase V to the Security Council. He emphasizes that the Programme cannot - and was never meant to - meet all the humanitarian needs of the Iraqi people, nor can it restore Iraq's economic and social infrastructure to pre-1990 levels.

10 June 1999: United Nations rejects allegations of "sabotage".

11 June 1999: The Secretary-General approves distribution plan for phase VI (S/1999/671). The plan, submitted by the Government of Iraq, proposes spending just over three billion dollars on food, medicine and other humanitarian supplies - including $300 million on oil industry spare parts and equipment.

2 July 1999: The Secretary-General submits to the Security Council a detailed list of spare parts and equipment requirements in the oil industry sector.

22 July 1999: During a visit to Iraq, OIP Executive Director holds series of working meetings with the Vice President of Iraq as well as all the relevant Ministers involved in the implementation of the Programme.

26 August 1999: OIP Executive Director introduces the 90-day report on phase VI of the Secretary-General to the Security Council.

4 October 1999: Resolution 1266 (1999) adopted by the Security Council permits Iraq to export an additional amount of $3.04 billion of oil in phase VI to make up for the "humanitarian deficit" in revenue in phases IV and V.

12 October 1999: Secretary-General recommends that the Security Council approve the request to increase by $300 million the allocation for oil spare parts and equipment, bringing the total allocation to $600 million, during phase VI.

22 October 1999: The Secretary-General in a letter to the Security Council expresses concern over the growing number of holds placed on applications and the resultant serious implications for the implementation of the humanitarian programme.

17 November 1999: Benon V. Sevan, OIP Executive Director, presents the Secretary-General's 180 Day report on implementation of SCR 1242 (1999). He says that a new review will be undertaken with a view to proposing to the Council various measures to enhance further the effectiveness of this programme.

19 November 1999: Resolution 1275 extends phase VI for two weeks, until 4 December 1999.

3 December 1999: Resolution 1280 extends phase VI for one week, until 11 December 1999.

10 December 1999: The Security Council adopts resolution 1281, extending the Programme for another 180 days as of 12 December 1999 (phase VII).

17 December 1999: The Security Council adopts resolution 1284. It establishes, as a subsidiary body of the Council, the United Nations Monitoring, Verification and Inspection Commission (UNMOVIC) which replaces the Special Commission.

12 January 2000: The Secretary-General approves distribution plan for phase VII (S/2000/18). The plan was submitted by the Government of Iraq and proposes spending just over three and half billion dollars on food, medicine and other humanitarian supplies - including $600 million on oil industry spare parts and equipment.

14 January 2000: The Secretary-General forwards to the Security Council the report of the oil industry expert on Iraq's oil industry needs. (S/2000/26)

14 January 2000: The Secretary-General submits to the Security Council a report on the status of implementation of certain provisions of resolution 1284 (1999). (S/2000/22)

7 February 2000: Briefing by Benon V. Sevan, OIP Executive Director, to the Security Council on recent developments in the Programme.

12 February 2000: The UN Humanitarian Coordinator for Iraq, Hans von Sponeck, announces he will leave his post, effective 31 March 2000.

1 March 2000: In line with para. 17 of resolution 1284 (1999), the UN begins implementation of accelerated or "fast track" procedures for the approval by notification of contracts for humanitarian supplies as per lists approved by the 661 Committee.

10 March 2000: The Secretary-General's report (S/2000/208) is issued and it comprises three parts: 1) a review of programme progress in meeting the humanitarian needs of the Iraqi people and on the revenues necessary to meet those needs; 2) the results of a comprehensive survey by a group of experts on Iraq's existing oil production and export capacity and; 3) the 90-day report of phase VII.

20 March 2000: Report of the group of UN oil experts on the status of Iraq's oil industry.

24 March 2000: The Secretary-General's statement to the Security Council on the humanitarian situation in Iraq.

29 March 2000: The Secretary-General appoints Tun Myat of Myanmar as United Nations Humanitarian Coordinator in Iraq.

29 March 2000: The Security Council Committee approves two more lists of commodities - in health and agriculture sectors - for "fast track" contract processing.

31 March 2000: Security Council adopts resolution 1293 based on the recommendation of the Secretary-General's report of 10 March 2000 (S/2000/208), raising the funding level for oil spare parts and equipment from $300 million to $600 million per phase.

20 April 2000: At a formal meeting of the 661 Committee on the issue of "holds" Benon V. Sevan points out that the effectiveness of the programme has suffered considerably, not only because of funding shortfalls in earlier phases, but also because of the very large number of applications on hold. He reiterates the Secretary-General's appeal for a further review and reconsideration of applications on hold which have a direct negative impact on the implementation of the programme.

25 April 2000: Briefing by Benon V. Sevan, OIP Executive Director, to the Security Council 661 Committee on the United Nations observation mechanism in Iraq.

29 April 2000: Tun Myat arrives in Iraq and assumes the responsibilities of his post as UN Humanitarian Coordinator in Iraq.

1 June 2000: The Secretary-General issues the 180-day report (S/2000/520) on phase VII.

6 June 2000: Benon V. Sevan, Executive Director of OIP presents the report of the Secretary-General to the Security Council at its informal consultations.

8 June 2000: The Security Council adopts resolution 1302 which extends the programme for another 180 days as of 9 June 2000. It invites the Secretary-General to appoint independent experts to prepare a comprehensive report and analysis of the humanitarian situation in Iraq. Other measures include: application of accelerated procedures for the approval of water and sanitation equipment; allocation of $600 million for oil spare parts under phase VIII; and requests the Secretary-General to appoint additional oil overseers.

12 June 2000: The Secretary-General approves the proposal of the Government of Iraq to include a new housing sector in the distribution plans for phases VI and VII.

21 June 2000: Through an exchange of letters between the Secretariat of the United Nations and the Government of Iraq, the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) of 20 May 1996 on the implementation of Security Council resolution 986 (1995) is extended for the duration of phase VIII (S/2000/618).

28 June 2000: A gunman attacks the Baghdad office of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). Two FAO staff are killed and six injured, including four Iraqi government guards, in an exchange of gunfire.

10 July 2000: The Government of Iraq comments on the 180-day report of the Secretary-General on phase VII (S/2000/520) (S/2000/668).

10 July 2000: The Security Council concurs with the recommendation of the Secretary-General contained in his report of 1 June 2000 (S/2000/520) concerning the use of surplus funds available from previous phases to fund humanitarian supplies to Iraq under subsequent phases.

17 July 2000: The Security Council Committee (661) approves the list of oil spare parts and equipment eligible for approval by notification under the accelerated procedures.

24 July 2000: The Executive Director of OIP informs the Security Council Committee that the new UN observation mechanism, as outlined at the 199th formal meeting of the Committee on 25 April, has been implemented in Iraq as of 20 July 2000.

25 July 2000: The Secretary-General approves the distribution plan for phase VIII of the oil- for-food programme (S/2000/733). The plan, submitted by the Government of Iraq, proposes spending $7.1 billion on food, medicine and other humanitarian supplies - including $600 million on oil industry spare parts and equipment.

10 August 2000: The Secretary-General appoints two additional oil overseers.

11 August 2000: The Security Council Committee (661) approves the list of water and sanitation supplies eligible for approval by notification under the accelerated or "fast track" procedures.

1 - 16 August 2000: Benon V. Sevan, the Executive Director of OIP undertakes a 2-week mission to Iraq. Issues a statement on the status of the programme.

1 September 2000: The Security Council approves a massive expansion of the health sector list for "fast track" procedures.

21 September 2000: OIP Executive Director, Benon V. Sevan, presents the 90-day report of the Secretary-General to the Security Council.

3 October 2000: In a letter (S/2000/950) to the President of the Security Council, the Secretary-General expresses serious concern on the total value of holds on applications for humanitarian supplies.

19 October 2000: On a visit to New York, the UN Humanitarian Coordinator in Iraq, Tun Myat, speaks on programme implementation at a press conference.

31 October 2000: The Security Council's 661 Committee authorises the UN Treasury to open an UN Iraq account in euro. It also requests an in-depth report within three months on the costs and benefits for the Programme and other financial and administrative implications of the payment for Iraqi oil in euro.

29 November 2000: The Secretary-General issues the 180-day report (S/2000/1132) for phase VIII.

4 December 2000: OIP Executive Director, Benon V. Sevan, presents the 180-day report (S/2000/1132) to the Security Council.

5 December 2000: The Security Council adopts resolution 1330 extending the programme for an additional 180 days (phase IX). It directs the sanctions Committee to approve lists of supplies and equipment in the electricity and housing sectors for "fast track" approval procedures, as well as expand the existing lists in other sectors; reduces the allocation for the UN Compensation Fund from 30 to 25 per cent, transferring the additional funds to the "53 per cent" account for humanitarian supplies in the centre/south of Iraq to address the needs of the most vulnerable groups and; requests the Secretary-General to make arrangements to allow funds up to 600 million euros to be used for the cost of installation and maintenance for the oil industry.

10 December 2000: In a letter to the Secretary-General (S/2000/1175) Iraq comments on resolution 1330.

1 - 12 December 2000: Iraq suspends its oil exports under the United Nations oil-for-food programme over oil pricing disagreement with the UN.

13 February 2001: In a letter to the President of the Security Council, the Secretary-General advises of his approval of phase IX distribution plan (S/2001/134), which was submitted by the Government of Iraq on 4 February 2001. The plan foresees a humanitarian budget of over $5.55 billion for 12 sectors countrywide.

26 February 2001: The Security Council's 661 sanctions committee approves a list of 26 items in the housing sector for "fast track" processing by OIP.

26 - 27 February 2001: High-level talks are held in New York between the United Nations and an Iraqi delegation headed by the Foreign Minister of Iraq on the situation in Iraq, including the humanitarian programme.

2 March 2001: The Secretary-General's phase IX "90-day" report (S/2001/186 & S/2001/186/Corr.1) is issued.

8 March 2001: The Executive Director of OIP presents phase IX "90-day" report to the Security Council.

18 May 2001: The Secretary-General's phase IX "180-day" report (S/2001/505) is issued.

24 May 2001: A list of 97 items is approved by the Security Council's 661 sanctions committee in the electricity sector for "fast-track" processing, in compliance with resolution 1330 (2000).

1 June 2001: Security Council adopts resolution 1352 (2001), extending the terms of resolution 1330 (2000), or phase IX, for another 30 days.

6 June 2001: The Secretary-General's report (S/2001/566) to the Security Council on the 'cash component' for the Iraqi oil industry under the United Nations oil-for-food programme is issued.

26 & 28 June 2001: The Security Council holds an "open meeting" on Iraq at the request of the Russian Federation. The Under-Secretary for Foreign Affairs of Iraq, Mr. Riyadh Al-Qaysi, as well as 38 member-states, including the 15 members of the Security Council, and and the Permanent Observer of the League of Arab States (LAS) address the Council.

3 July 2001: The Security Council adopts resolution 1360 extending the programme for an additional 150 days (phase X).

9 July 2001: Through an exchange of letters between the Secretariat of the United Nations and the Government of Iraq, the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) of 20 May 1996 on the implementation of Security Council resolution 986 (1995) is extended for the duration of phase X (S/2001/682).

4 June - 10 July 2001: Iraq suspends its oil exports under the programme over its rejection of resolution 1352 (2001).

12 July 2001: The Executive Director of OIP briefs the Security Council's 661 sanctions committee on the implementation of the oil-for-food programme, responding, by-and-large, to allegations made against the Programme by Iraq at the Security Council's "open meeting" of 28 June.

1 August 2001: In a letter to the President of the Security Council, the Secretary-General advises of his approval of phase X distribution plan (S/2001/758), submitted by the Government of Iraq on 23 July 2001. The plan foresees a humanitarian budget of $5.5 billion for 12 sectors countrywide.

2 September 2001: The Government of Iraq declares four current and one former UNOHCI staff persona non grata.

28 September 2001: The Secretary-General's 90-day report on phase X is issued (S/2001/919).

19 November 2001: The Secretary-General's 150-day report on phase X is issued (S/2001/1089).

29 November 2001: The Security Council adopts resolution 1382, extending the programme for an additional 180 days (phase XI). Phase XI is to be in effect from 1 December 2001 to 29 May 2002. Para. 2 of the resolution states the Council's decision to adopt the Goods Review List and relevant procedures, subject to any refinements to them agreed by the Council, for implementation beginning on 30 May 2002. Para. 6 of the resolution reaffirms the Council's commitment to a comprehensive settlement on the issue of Iraq on the basis of relevant Security Council resolutions.

6 December 2001: Through an exchange of letters between the Secretariat of the United Nations and the Government of Iraq, the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) of 20 May 1996 on the implementation of Security Council resolution 986 (1995) is extended for the duration of phase XI (S/2001/1172).

3 January 2002: In a letter to the President of the Security Council, the Secretary-General advises of his approval of phase XI distribution plan (S/2002/19), submitted by the Government of Iraq on 23 December 2001. The plan foresees a humanitarian budget of over $4.43 billion for 13 sectors countrywide.

14 January - 10 February 2002: The Executive Director of the Iraq Programme, Benon V. Sevan, undertakes a three-week working visit to Iraq, including a week-long visit to the three northern governorates. He meets with the Vice-President of the Republic of Iraq, Taha Yasin Ramadan, the Ministers of Foreign Affairs, Oil, Trade, Health, Interior, Higher Education, Agriculture and the Commissioner of Electricity, as well as the local authorities in the three northern governorates and representatives of the United Nations agencies and programmes to review the implementation of the humanitarian in Iraq pursuant to Security Council resolution 986 (1995), with a view to improving further the effective implementation of the programme.

26 February 2002: The Executive Director of the Iraq Programme briefs the Security Council on his visit to Iraq.

8 April 2002: The Government of Iraq announces a 30-day suspension of its oil exports under the programme, in support of Palestinians. Exports resume on 9 May.

14 May 2002: The Security Council adopts resolution 1409 (2002), introducing the Goods Review List (GRL) and a new set of procedures for the processing and approval of contracts for humanitarian supplies and equipment. The resolution marks the second most significant change in the programme after resolution 1284 (1999). It also extends the programme for another 180 days (phase XII), effective 30 May 2002. The phase ends on 25 November 2002.

28 May 2002: Through letters exchanged between the Secretariat of the United Nations and the Permanent Mission of Iraq to the United Nations, the memorandum of understanding of 20 May 1996 concerning the implementation of Security Council resolution 986 (1995), was extended for a new period of 180 days, effective 30 May 2002 (phase XII), in the light of Security Council resolution 1409 (2002) (S/2002/608).

29 May 2002: The Executive Director of the Iraq Programme briefs the Security Council on the status of the programme at the end of phase XI.

31 May 2002: Secretary-General appoints Ramiro Armando de Oliveira Lopes da Silva of Portugal as new UN Humanitarian Coordinator in Iraq. Mr. da Silva would succeed Tun Myat in the post. Mr. Myat was appointed as Humanitarian Coodinator in March 2000.

13 June 2002: In a letter to the President of the Security Council, the Secretary-General advises of his approval of phase XII distribution plan (S/2002/666), submitted by the Government of Iraq on 10 June 2002. The plan foresees a humanitarian budget of over $5.08 billion for 25 sectors countrywide.

17 June 2002: In letters addressed to the Chairman of the 661 Committee and the Permanent Representative of Iraq to the United Nations, the Executive Director of OIP informed them that following the consent of the Government of Iraq, OIP would proceed with the necessary arrangements to deploy United Nations independent inspection agents at Ar'ar border crossing between Iraq and Saudi Arabia for the purpose of confirming and authenticating the delivery of supplies to Iraq under the "oil-for-food" programme. The action was based on a request from Saudi Arabia for the opening of the border crossing point at Ar'ar dating back to October 2000. The Government of Iraq had indicated its agreement to the United Nations earlier in June 2002.

15 July 2002: OIP, UNMOVIC and IAEA begin the full implementation of the new set of procedures under resolution 1409 (2002) for the processing and review of contracts for humanitarian supplies.

19 July 2002: Ramiro Armando de Oliveira Lopes da Silva arrives in Iraq and assumes the responsibilities of the UN Humanitarian Coordinator in Iraq.

25 September 2002: The Executive Director of the Iraq Programme briefs the Security Council on the status of the programme.

28 October 2002: The Security Council's 661 sanctions committee approves a list of about 6,000 items to be "fast tracked" by OIP, in compliance with paragraph 4 of the revised procedures under resolution 1409 (2002).

1 November 2002: A UN team of five independent inspection agents arrive at Ar'ar crossing point at the border of Iraq with Saudi Arabia, to finalise preparations for the establishment of a UN inspection site at this border crossing point. The inspection site at Ar'ar, which would become fully operational on 8 November 2002, would be the fifth authorized border crossing for the import of goods under the oil-for-food programme. United Nations independent inspection agents at authorized points of entry confirm and authenticate the delivery of humanitarian supplies to Iraq under the oil-for-food programme only. The other four authorized entry points are: Trebil, at the border of Iraq and Jordan; Al-Walid, at the border of Iraq and Syria; Zakho, on the border of Iraq with Turkey; and Port of Umm Qasr in the Gulf.

12 November 2002: The Secretary-General's report under paragraphs 7 & 8 of resolution 1409 (2002) is issued (S/2002/1239). It focuses on three main areas: (1) achievements made through the programme in improving the humanitarian situation in Iraq, as well as referring to some of the shortcomings and difficulties faced; (2) the persisting revenue shortfall in the programme; and (3) an assessment of the implementation of the new set of procedures for the processing and review of contracts for humanitarian supplies, introduced under resolution 1409 (2002) in May 2002, based on the Goods Review List (GRL). It is the first such assessment since the adoption of that resolution. Concurrently, OIP releases its latest Note on the implementation of the humanitarian programme under resolution 986 (1995) - prepared in lieu of the 180-day report on phase XII.

19 November 2002: OIP Executive Director introduces the Secretary-General's report (S/2002/1239) to the Security Council.

25 November 2002: The Security Council adopts resolution 1443 (2002), which extends phase XII for another 9 days until 4 December 2002.

4 December 2002: The Security Council adopts resolution 1447, extending the programme for an additional 180 days (phase XIII). Phase XIII is to be in effect from 5 December 2002 to 3 June 2003.

11 December 2002: The United Nations and the Government of the Republic of Iraq agreed on 11 December to extend the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) of 20 May 1996 for the oil-for-food programme for an additional 180 days through 3 June 2003 (phase Xlll). The MOU established the terms of implementation of the oil-for-food programme under resolution 986 (14 April 1995).

30 December 2002: On Monday 30 December, the Security Council approved changes to the list of goods subject to review and approval by the 661 Committee under the United Nations oil-for-food programme, as well as new procedures for implementation of the list. The changes to the goods review list (GRL), which went into effect under resolution 1454, also require a thorough review of the List and its procedures, both 90 days after the commencement of phase Xlll of the programme (5 December 2002) and prior to the end of its defined 180-day period (3 June 2003).

3 January 2003: In a letter to the President of the Security Council, the Secretary-General advises of his approval of phase XIII distribution plan (S/2003/6), submitted by the Government of Iraq on 31 December 2002. The plan foresees a humanitarian budget of $4.93 billion for 25 sectors countrywide.

21 February 2003: Under a cover letter addressed to the Chairman of the Security Council's 661 Committee, the OIP Executive Director transmitted a Note by the Office of the Iraq Programme on consumption rates and use levels for a number of items on the Goods Review List. The action was required by paragraph 3 of Security Council resolution 1454 (2002). OIP would start implementing the consumptions rates indicated in the Note on 1 March 2003.

17 March 2003: On 17 March 2003, the United Nations Secretary-General announced that in view of warnings received from the Governments of the United Kingdom and the United States, regarding the continued safety and security of UN personnel present in the territory of Iraq, he had decided that he was no longer in a position to guarantee the safety and security of these personnel. As a result, he was obliged to withdraw temporarily all remaining humanitarian personnel from Iraq.

18 March 2003: The President of the Security Council asks the Secretary General to submit proposals to adjust the mandate of the Oil-for-Food Programme so that it will have the necessary flexibility to meet new humanitarian challenges presented by the prospect of war in Iraq.

19 March 2003: War in Iraq begins with the bombing of Baghdad.

20 March 2003: The Secretary General pledges to do his utmost to ensure that the UN rises to the challenge of shielding the civilian population "from the grim consequences of war."

28 March 2003: A resolution was adopted unanimously by the Security Council to adjust the Oil-for-Food Programme and give the Secretary-General authority to facilitate the delivery and receipt of goods contracted by the Government of Iraq for the humanitarian needs of its people.

8 April 2003: Benon V. Sevan, Executive Director of the Office of the Iraq Programme, briefed members of the Security Council on the implementation of resolution 1472 (2003) since its adoption on 28 March, 2003.

22 April 2003: Benon V. Sevan, Executive Director of the Office of the Iraq Programme, briefed members of the Security Council on the implementation of resolution 1472 (2003).

24 April 2003: Provisions for the Secretary-General to accelerate the delivery of priority items in the Oil-for-Food pipeline to Iraq were extended to 3 June. The extension under resolution 1476,(2003) adopted by the Security Council gave gives the Office of the Iraq Programme and UN agencies, valuable time to identify and ship additional goods and supplies.

8 May 2003: Report of the Secretary-General (S/2003/576) pursuant to resolutions 1447 (2002), 1472 (2003) and 1476 (2003) (180 day report of phase X111).

22 May 2003: The Security Council adopted resolution 1483 (2003) lifting civilian sanctions and providing for termination of the Oil-for-Food Programme within six months and transferring responsibility for the administration of any remaining activity to the Authority representing the occupying powers.

22 May 2003: The Executive Director of the Oil-for-Food Programme (Mr. Benon Sevan) welcomed the adoption of resolution 1483 (2003) lifting civilian sanctions on Iraq and phasing out the Programme over the next six months. "The lifting of sanctions represents long-awaited relief for the Iraqi people,” he said.

11 June 2003: Report of the Secretary-General pursuant to paragraph 16 (c) of resolution 1483 (2003). The report provides an estimated operating budget for all known and projected costs associated with the implementation of resolution 1483, including the termination of the Oil-for-Food Programme.

26 June 2003: Mr. Benon V. Sevan, Executive Director, Office of the Iraq Programme briefed the Security Council on the implementation of resolution 1483 .

17 July 2003: Report of the Secretary-General (S/2003/715) pursuant to paragraph 24 of Security Council resolution 1483 (2003) on the work of the Special Representative. The report provides an initial assessment of the challenges in implementing the mandate under resolution 1483 and indicates areas in which the SG feels the UN can play a useful role.

29 September 2003: Security Council briefing by Mr. Benon V. Sevan, Executive Director, Office of the Iraq Programme, on phasing down and termination of the Programme, pursuant to Security Council resolution 1483 (2003).

28 October 2003: Statement to the Security Council by Benon V. Sevan, Executive Director of the Iraq Programme, updating Members on the Phasing down and termination of the Programme pursuant to Security Council resolution 1483 (2003)

19 November 2003: Statement by Benon V. Sevan, Executive Director of the Iraq Programme, to the Security Council, on progress in the phasing down and termination of the Oil-for-Food Programme.

20 November 2003: Statement by the President of the Security Council on the situation between Iraq and Kuwait: Termination of the Oil-for- Food Programme

20 November 2003: Statement by the Secretary General on the termination of the Oil-for-Food Programme.

21 November 2003: Effective termination and handover of the Oil-for-Food Programme to the Coalition Provisional Authority.

         


          About the Programme

Fact Sheet

  • At the time of its termination on 21 November 2003, some $31 billion worth humanitarian supplies and equipment had been delivered to Iraq under the Oil-for-Food Programme, including $1.6 billion worth of oil industry spare parts and equipment. An additional $8.2 billion worth of supplies were in the production and delivery pipeline.
  • In August 1990, the Security Council adopted resolution 661, imposing comprehensive sanctions on Iraq following that country’s invasion of Kuwait. In the immediate aftermath of the Gulf War in 1991, the Secretary-General dispatched an inter-agency mission in order to assess the humanitarian needs arising in Iraq and Kuwait.  The mission visited Iraq from 10 to 17 March 1991 and reported that "the Iraqi people may soon face a further imminent catastrophe, which could include epidemic and famine, if massive life-supporting needs are not rapidly met." (S/22366, para. 37).  Throughout 1991, with growing concern over the humanitarian situation in Iraq, the United Nations proposed measures to enable Iraq to sell limited quantities of oil to meet its people's needs. The Government of Iraq declined these offers, contained in particular, in resolutions 706 (1991) and 712 (1991), adopted, respectively, in August and September 1991.
  • On 14 April 1995, acting under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter, the Security Council adopted resolution 986, establishing the "Oil-for-Food" Programme, providing Iraq with another opportunity to sell oil to finance the purchase of humanitarian goods, and various mandated United Nations activities concerning Iraq. The Programme, as established by the Security Council, was intended to be a "temporary measure to provide for the humanitarian needs of the Iraqi people, until the fulfillment by Iraq of the relevant Security Council resolutions, including notably resolution 687 (1991) of 3 April 1991".   
  • Although established in April 1995, the implementation of the Programme started only in December 1996, after the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the United Nations and the Government of Iraq on 20 May 1996 (S/1996/356). The first oil was exported under the Programme in December 1996 and the first shipment of supplies arrived under the Programme in March 1997.
  • The Programme was funded exclusively with the proceeds from Iraqi oil exports, authorised by the Security Council. In the initial stages of the Programme, Iraq was permitted to sell $2 billion worth of oil every six months, with two-thirds of that amount to be used to meet Iraq’s humanitarian needs. In 1998, the limit on the level of Iraqi oil exports under the Programme was raised to $5.26 billion every six months, again with two-thirds of the oil proceeds to be earmarked to meet the humanitarian needs of the Iraqi people. In December 1999, the ceiling on Iraqi oil exports under the Programme was completely removed by the Security Council.
  • Seventy two per cent of Iraqi oil export proceeds was allocated to the humanitarian Programme, of which 59% was earmarked for the contracting of supplies and equipment by the Government of Iraq for the 15 central and southern governorates and 13% for the three northern governorates, where the United Nations implemented the Programme on behalf of the Government of Iraq. Of the balance from total oil revenues, 25% was allocated to the Compensation Fund for war reparation payments, 2.2% for United Nations administrative and operational costs; and 0.8% for the weapons inspection programme.
  • The Office of the Iraq Programme, headed by an Executive Director, was responsible for the overall management and coordination of all United Nations humanitarian activities in Iraq under resolutions 661 (1990) and 986 (1995) and the procedures established by the Security Council and its Committee set up by resolution 661 (1990), as well as the MOU between the United Nations and the Government of Iraq.
  • The Office of the Iraq Programme administered the Programme as an operation separate and distinct from all other United Nations activities within the context of the former sanctions regime (see below),  within the purview of UNMOVIC, IAEA and the United Nations Compensation Commission.
  • The Office of the Humanitarian Coordinator in Iraq (UNOHCI) was an integral part of the Office of the Iraq Programme.  Reporting directly to the Executive Director of OIP, the Humanitarian Coordinator in Iraq was responsible for the management and implementation of the Programme in the field.
  • Nine United Nations agencies and programmes were responsible for implementing the Programme in the three northern governorates. They are: FAO, UNESCO, WHO, ITU, UNICEF, UNDP, WFP, UNOPS, UN-Habitat.
  • On 28 May 2003, the Secretary-General (S/2003/576) pursuant to resolutions 1447 (2002), 1472 (2003) and 1476 (2003) presented the Programme's last 180-day report (Phase X111). Among other things, the report reflected on a difficult security situation and the withdrawal of international staff prior to the onset of war in March 2003. 
  • Over the life of the Programme, the Security Council expanded its initial emphasis on food and medicines to include infrastructure rehabilitation and activities in 24 sectors: food, food-handling, health, nutrition, electricity, agriculture and irrigation, education, transport and telecommunications, water and sanitation, housing, settlement rehabilitation (internally displaced persons — IDPs), demining, special allocation for especially vulnerable groups, and oil industry spare parts and equipment. The Government of Iraq introduced the following 10 new sectors in June 2002: construction, industry, labour and social affairs, Board of Youth and Sports, information, culture, religious affairs, justice, finance, and Central Bank of Iraq.
  • As of 20 March 2003, the Programme had helped to improve the overall socio-economic conditions of the Iraqi people countrywide. It prevented the further degradation of public services and infrastructure and in several areas, stabilised and improved access to such services.
  • In the food sector, the nutritional value of the monthly food basket distributed countrywide almost doubled between 1996 and 2002, from about 1,200 to about 2,200 kilocalories per person per day.
  • There were notable achievements in the health sector. Between 1997 and 2002, the capacity to undertake major surgeries increased by 40% and laboratory investigations by 25% in the centre and south of Iraq. Communicable diseases, including cholera, malaria, measles, mumps, meningitis and tuberculosis were reduced in the centre/south during this period. As of 29 May 2003 there had been no cases of polio in Iraq for more than three years. In the three northern governorates, cholera was eradicated and the incidence of malaria reduced to the 1991 level. Vaccinations reduced measles morbidity considerably.
  • In nutrition, malnutrition rates in 2002 in the centre/south were half those of 1996 among children under the age of five. Preliminary findings indicated that between 1996 and 2002 there was a reduction in the number of underweight children from 23%  to 10% ; chronic malnutrition from 32%  to 24%  and acute malnutrition from 11% to 5.4%. During the same period, in the three northern governorates, there was a 56% reduction in chronic malnutrition and a 44% reduction in the incidence of underweight children in the under-five age group. On 29 May 2003, UNICEF reported however that child malnutrition in Iraq almost doubled from four per cent to 7.7 percent between the onset of war - 20 March 2003 and 29 May 2003. The decline was attributed to broken public services and the lack of proper access to food, clean water, sanitation, and hygiene.
  • Transportation: In the period to 20 March 2003, private and public road transport was rehabilitated to varying degrees, and safe, reliable inter-city public passenger transportation services were restored.
  • Water and sanitation: In the period to 20 March 2003, the deterioration of water facilities was halted. Oil-for-Food Programme supplies and equipment improved access to potable water, and helped to reduce the incidence of water-borne illnesses, including diarrhoeah.
  • Agriculture: In the period to 20 March 2003, agricultural improvements enabled large segments of the population to purchase produce at affordable prices. In the centre/south, poultry and egg production doubled. In the three northern governorates, Programme supplies contributed to a substantial increase in agricultural production.
  • Electricity: In the period to 20 March 2003, access to electricity was extended and supply became more reliable. During the summer of 2002, there were no planned power cuts in Baghdad City.
  • Telecommunication: In the period to 20 March 2003, improved infrastructure in the centre/south was reflected in the increased number of telephone calls placed successfully.
  • Education: In the period to 20 March 2003, the distribution of 1.2 million school desks met 60% of the needs at primary and secondary schools in the centre/south. This was a great improvement on the situation in 1996, when students at those schools were forced to sit on bare floors. In the three northern governorates, the Programme helped to increase primary school attendance by 32% between 1996 and 2002 and secondary school attendance by over 74% during the same period. Most schools operated in two rather than three shifts, as a result of the greater availability of educational facilities.
  • Residential construction:  In late 2002, housing construction in the centre/south was expected to reach 14,432,896 square metres, compared with 13,930,490 square metres in 1990 and 347,892 square metres in 1996. New construction also created jobs for skilled and unskilled workers. As part of the assistance provided to internally displaced persons (IDPs) and most vulnerable groups in the three northern governorates, 19,051 dwelling units were constructed between 1996 and early 2003 to house some 114,300 persons. Over the same period, new construction or repair affected some 685 schools and other educational facilities benefiting 190,000 students; 127 health centres for more than 120 communities and villages; 99 agricultural and veterinary facilities; 49 social and civic buildings; 853 kilometres of water systems and 2,800 kilometres of roads and bridges.
  • Demining activities: Between 1998 and 2002, the UNOPS Mine Action Programme cleared some 76,500 mines from 9.1 million square metres of land, of which 3.95 million square metres were returned to the local population for productive use. The programme also worked with some 2,000 mine accident and war victims, providing surgery, prosthetics and other rehabilitation services. Tens of thousands of women and children received Mine Risk education. Mined areas yet to be cleared were marked with warning signs. 
Despite its achievements however, the Oil-for-Food Programme was never intended to be a substitute for normal economic activity, and as of 20 March 2003, much remained to be done to improve humanitarian conditions for the Iraqi people. 

Pre-War and Post-War Developments (2003) 

On 17 March 2003, the United Nations Secretary-General announced that in view of warnings received from the Governments of the United Kingdom and the United States, regarding the prospect of war and the continued safety and security of UN personnel present in the territory of Iraq, he was no longer in a position to guarantee their safety and security. All remaining UN international staff in Iraq were evacuated on 18 March 2003 and the President of the Security Council asked the Secretary General to submit proposals to adjust the mandate of the Oil-for-Food Programme so that it would have flexibility to meet new humanitarian challenges presented by the prospect of war in Iraq.  

On 19 March 2003, the war in Iraq began with the bombing of Baghdad and on 20 March 2003, the Secretary General pledged to do his utmost to ensure that the UN rose to the challenge of shielding the civilian population "from the grim consequences of war."

 

A resolution (1472) was adopted unanimously by the Security Council on 28 March 2003 adjusting the Oil-for-Food Programme and giving the Secretary-General authority to facilitate the delivery and receipt of goods contracted by the Government of Iraq for the humanitarian needs of its people. On 24 April 2003 those provisions were extended to 3 June. The extension under resolution 1476,(2003) gave the Office of the Iraq Programme and UN agencies, valuable time to identify and ship additional goods and supplies.

 

The Security Council lifted civilian sanctions on Iraq on 22 May with the adoption of resolution 1483 (2003). The resolution also gave the Secretary-General authority to appoint a Special Representative to work with the occupying forces in rebuilding Iraq; opened the way for the resumption of oil exports, with revenues deposited in a Development Fund for Iraq held by the Central Bank; and provided for the termination of the Oil-for-Food Programme within six months, transferring responsibility for the administration of any remaining Programme activities to ‘the Authority’ representing the occupying powers. The Council called on the United Nations to assist the Iraqi people, in coordination with ‘the Authority’, in a wide range of areas, including humanitarian relief, reconstruction, infrastructure rehabilitation, legal and judicial reforms, human rights and the return of refugees, and also to assist with civilian police. 

In its “phasedown” prior to closure on 21 November 2003, the Office of the Iraq Programme and UN agencies and programmes continued to identify and ship approved and funded priority items in a pipeline of humanitarian goods and supplies valued at some $8.2 billion.  

As of 21 November, consultations between the Coalition Provisional Authority, Iraqi experts and the United Nations, had resulted in the prioritization of more than 86 per cent of the contracts in the pipeline. Money to pay for these contracts remained in the UN/Iraq account, to be paid after the UN had confirmed the supplies were delivered to Iraq. Despite the closure of the Programme, deliveries of humanitarian items, including food were expected top continue well into 2004.



In Brief

21 November 2003

SANCTIONS IMPOSED: In August 1990 the Security Council adopted resolution 661, imposing comprehensive sanctions on Iraq following that country’s short-lived invasion of Kuwait. Throughout 1991, with growing concern over the humanitarian situation in Iraq, the United Nations and others proposed measures to enable Iraq to sell limited quantities of oil to meet its people's needs. The Government of Iraq declined these offers, contained in particular, in resolutions 706 and 712, adopted in August and September 1991.

AGREEMENT ON OIL-FOR-FOOD: An oil-for-food programme began at the end of 1996 after the United Nations and the Government of Iraq agreed on the details of implementing resolution 986 (1995), which permitted Iraq to sell up to two billion dollars worth of oil in a 180-day period. The ceiling on oil sales was eased during 1998 and finally lifted in 1999, enabling the programme to move from a focus on food and medicine to repairing essential infrastructure, including the oil industry.

DIVIDING THE MONEY: With the adoption of Security Council resolution 1330 (2000) on 5 December 2000, around 72 per cent of the oil revenue funds were allocated to the humanitarian programme in Iraq (59 per cent for the centre and south and 13 per cent for the three northern governorates); 25 percent to the Compensation Commission in Geneva; 2.2 per cent for United Nations operational costs; and 0.8 per cent for the UN Monitoring, Verification and Inspection Commission (UNMOVIC) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Previously, 66 per cent had been allocated to the humanitarian programme (53 per cent for the centre and south and 13 per cent for the three northern governorates), with the Compensation Commission receiving 30 per cent of the revenue. Funds from the two humanitarian accounts also financed the purchase of oil industry parts and equipment to sustain this source of revenue. The Government of Iraq was responsible for the purchase and distribution of supplies in the 15 governorates in the centre and south. The United Nations implemented the programme in the three northern governorates of Dahuk, Sulaymaniyah and Erbil on behalf of the Government of Iraq.

THE DISTRIBUTION PLAN: The programme operated against distribution plans prepared at the beginning of each phase by the Government of Iraq and approved by the Secretary-General. Once approved, the distribution plan became the basis for Iraq’s use of revenue raised during that phase. Distribution plans included thousands of pages of detailed annexes and, from phase V onwards, were posted on the OIP Web site. The Web site also included the status of all contracts from phase V onwards.

OIL-FOR-FOOD: Phase I ran from 10 December 1996 to 7 June 1997. The first oil was exported on 15 December 1996 and the first contracts financed from the sale of oil were approved in January 1997. The first shipments of food arrived in Iraq in March 1997 and the first medicines arrived in May 1997. The Security Council continued the programme in 180-day periods called “phases”. The final oil exporting period (phase XIII) authorized by Security Council resolution 1447 (2002), was in effect from 5 December 2002 through 3 June 2003.

FOOD & MEDICINE: Between March 1997 and March 2003, foodstuffs worth some $13 billion and medicines and health supplies worth over $2 billion, have been delivered to Iraq. The programme helped to improve the overall socio-economic condition of the Iraqi people countrywide and prevented the further degradation of public services and infrastructure under sanctions. (Economic sanctions were lifted on 22 May 2003). The nutritional value of the monthly food ration basket distributed countrywide almost doubled between 1996 and 2002, from about 1,200 to 2,200 kilocalories per person per day. Malnutrition rates in 2002 in the centre/south of Iraq were half those of 1996 among children under the age of five and the decline in malnutrition rates was even greater in the three northern governorates.

EXPANSION and the OIL INDUSTRY: In April 1998 the Security Council approved a recommendation from the Secretary-General that the ceiling of $2 billion in oil sales every six months be increased to $5.265 billion. That month, oil industry experts reported on the "lamentable state" of the oil industry and indicated that the oil production level authorized by the Security Council was well beyond Iraq’s capacity at current prices. Resolution 1175 in June 1998 authorized the import of $300 million worth of oil spares and equipment for phase IV. This limit was raised to $600 million per phase from phase VI onwards. A year later, Security Council resolution 1284 (1999) removed the oil export ceiling altogether.

APPROVING CONTRACTS: On 14 May 2002, the Security Council (resolution 1409), introduced the Goods Review List (GRL) and a new set of procedures for the processing and approval of contracts for civilian supplies and equipment. Until that time, most contracts for humanitarian supplies were circulated to the Council's 661 Sanctions Committee for approval. Under the new procedures only contracts containing GRL items were to be sent to the 661 Committee for consideration. 

As of 21 November 2003 when the Oil-for-Food Programme was terminated in keeping with Security Council resolution 1483 (22 May 2003), some $46 billion worth of humanitarian supplies, including about $3.8 billion worth of oil spare parts, had been approved by the 661 Sanctions Committee and the Office of the Iraq Programme. Of this amount, almost $31 billion worth of humanitarian supplies and equipment had been delivered to Iraq, including $1.6 billion worth of oil industry spare parts and equipment. An additional $8.2 billion worth of approved and funded supplies were in the production and delivery pipeline. For more information on the status of funds as of 21 November 2003.

FLUCTUATING OIL PRICES: The capacity of the Oil-for-Food Programme to deliver humanitarian assistance was always dependent on the international oil market. In its first three phases the price of oil was relatively high but the Security Council had placed a ceiling on exports. When the ceiling was raised in mid-1998, the price of oil was already collapsing and it was only from mid-1999 onwards that Iraq was able to take advantage of better prices and raised ceilings to improve its delivery capacity. Oil exports under the programme ended 20 March 2003 with the war, and economic sanctions were lifted on 22 May 2003 (resolution 1483) . For more information on oil exports.


15 December 2011
Security Council
SC/10490
IK/641

Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Security Council Press Statement on Iraq/Kuwait

 


The following Security Council press statement was issued on 15 December 2011 by Council President Vitaly Churkin (Russian Federation):


The members of the Security Council received a briefing from Ambassador Gennady Tarasov, the Secretary-General’s High-Level Coordinator, on the thirty-second report of the Secretary-General, in accordance with paragraph 14 of Security Council resolution 1284 (1999).


The members of the Security Council appreciated the efforts of Ambassador Tarasov and the important work of the International Committee of the Red Cross, the Tripartite Commission and its Technical Subcommittee during the reporting period.


The members of the Security Council welcomed the continued cooperation by the Governments of Iraq and Kuwait, and their high-level commitments to full implementation of all Iraqi obligations to Kuwait under the relevant resolutions.  Nevertheless, the members of the Security Council stressed the need for Iraq to build on the steps already taken to fully meet these commitments, specifically finding Kuwaiti or third-country nationals, property and archives.  The members of the Security Council once again expressed their deepest sympathy and condolences to the families of those involved.


The members of the Security Council welcomed the active participation by the Governments of Iraq and Kuwait in the efforts undertaken in the framework of the Technical Subcommittee, including the joint exploratory missions in Iraq.  The members of the Security Council noted the potential for these missions to become an effective functional mechanism to fully probe the fate of missing persons and urged continued cooperation to translate efforts into tangible results.


The members of the Security Council welcomed the Government of Iraq’s approval for an inter-ministerial committee to lead and coordinate efforts with regard to the Kuwaiti national archives.  The members of the Security Council noted the Secretary-General’s concern that no substantial progress had been made on clarifying the fate of the Kuwaiti national archives and noted that their previous calls for greater efforts with regard to the Kuwaiti national archives and other properties had so far yielded limited results.  The members of the Security Council therefore repeated their call for an intensification of efforts to clarify the whereabouts of the archives through the inter-ministerial committee and report its results to the United Nations.


The members of the Security Council called for Iraq and Kuwait to continue to act in the spirit of the confidence- and cooperation-building process, which should contribute to the further strengthening of their good neighbourly relations and enhancing of regional stability.


The members of the Security Council supported the Secretary-General’s recommendation to extend the financing of the activities of the High-level Coordinator for a further period of six months in order to continue to build upon the existing momentum towards the full implementation of paragraph 14 of Security Council resolution 1284 (1999).


The members of the Security Council expressed their willingness to consider this matter in the context of their review of the report by the Secretary-General, pursuant to paragraph 5 of resolution 1859 (2008).


* *** *


For information media • not an official record

This is a comprehensive United Nations Document list concerning Chapter Seven against Iraq!

Security Council Resolutions

  • S/RES/1956 (15 December 2010) extended the DFI and related immunities a final time until 30 June 2011 and affirmed that five per cent of Iraqi proceeds from oil sales would continue to be deposited into the compensation fund after that date.
  • S/RES/1957 (15 December 2010) terminated the WMD-related Chapter VII measures Iraq was subject to and urged Iraq to ratify the Additional Protocol as soon as possible.
  • S/RES/1958 (15 December 2010) terminated the Oil-for-Food programme and established an escrow account to provide indemnification to the UN with regard to the programme for a period of six years.
  • S/RES/1936 (5 August 2010) extended UNAMI's mandate through 31 July 2011. The resolution reaffirmed the importance of Iraq's ratification of the Additional Protocol to the Comprehensive Safeguards Agreement with the IAEA and called on Iraqi leaders to form a government as quickly as possible. 
  • S/RES/1905 (21 December 2009) extended the arrangements and related immunities for the DFI and the IAMB until 31 December 2010.
  • S/RES/1883 (7 August 2009) extended the mandate of UNAMI for another year.
  • S/RES/1859 (22 December 2008) extended the arrangements for the Development Fund for Iraq (DFI) and the International Advisory and Monitoring Board (IAMB) until 31 December 2009 with a review by 15 June. 
  • S/RES/1830 (7 August 2008) renewed the mandate of the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) for a period of 12 months.
  • S/RES/1790 (18 December 2007) extended the mandates of the MNF, the Development Fund for Iraq (DFI) and the International Advisory and Monitoring Board (IAMB) until 31 December 2008, with a review on 15 June, in addition to the DFI privileges and immunities equivalent to those enjoyed by the UN as established in resolution 1483 to facilitate the restructuring of Iraq’s debt.
  • S/RES/1770 (10 August 2007) extended UNAMI's mandate for twelve months and authorised an expanded role for the mission.
  • S/RES/1762 (29 June 2007) terminated UNMOVIC's mandate.
  • S/RES/1723 (28 November 2006) extended the MNF mandate until 31 December 2007.
  • S/RES/1700 (10 August 2006) extended the UNAMI mandate until 10 August 2007.
  • S/RES/1637 (8 November 2005) extended the Multi National Force's (MNF) mandate, the DFI and the IAMB until 31 December 2006.
  • S/RES/1619 (11 August 2005) extended UNAMI until 11 August 2006.
  • S/RES/1557 (12 August 2004) extended UNAMI until 12 August 2004.
  • S/RES/1546 (8 June 2004) endorsed the formation of the interim government and the holding of elections by January 2005, welcomed the end of occupation by 30 June 2004, endorsed the proposed timetable for the political transition, detailed the mandate of the SRSG, UNAMI and the MNF, and requested quarterly reports.
  • S/RES/1538 (21 April 2004) welcomed the inquiry into the oil-for-food programme.
  • S/RES/1518 (24 November 2003) established a sanctions committee.
  • S/RES/1511 (16 October 2003) reaffirmed the temporary nature of the Coalition Provisional Authority, endorsed the interim administration, called for a political timetable, authorised the MNF to maintain security and stability during 12 months. It also determined the status of the MNF and its relation to the UN, and asked the US to report every six months.
  • S/RES/1500 (14 August 2003) welcomed the establishment of the "broadly representative" Governing Council of Iraq and created UNAMI.
  • S/RES/1483 (22 May 2003) recognised the occupying powers, requested the Secretary-General to appoint a Special Representative for Iraq, established sanctions against the previous Iraqi government, created the DFI and envisaged the termination of the oil-for-food programme within six months.
  • S/RES/1476 (24 April 2003) extended the adjustments to the oil-for-food programme introduced by resolution 1472 until 3 June 2003.
  • S/RES/1472 (28 March 2003) called on all parties to abide by humanitarian law and made adjustments to the oil-for-food programme to deal with changes in the humanitarian situation following the US-led invasion.
  • S/RES/1441 (8 November 2002) decided that Iraq was in breach of its international obligations due to its lack of cooperation with UNMOVIC inspectors and decided to resume weapons inspections in Iraq and deplored the failure by Iraq to account for Kuwaiti and third-country nationals wrongfully detained.
  • S/RES/1284 (17 December 1999) established UNMOVIC and requested the Secretary-General to report to the Council every four months on the compliance by Iraq with its obligations regarding the repatriation or return of all Kuwaiti and third-country nationals.
  • S/RES/986 (14 April 1995) established the oil-for-food program.
  • S/RES/833 (27 May 1993) welcomed the Secretary-General's decision for the maintenance of the boundary until other arrangements were made by Iraq and Kuwait.
  • S/RES/706 (18 August 1991) requested the Secretary-General to submit a report on the repatriation or return of all Kuwaiti and third-country nationals.
  • S/RES/692 (20 May 1991) established the UNCC and the UN Compensation Fund.
  • S/RES/687 (3 April 1991) decided that Iraq should extend all necessary cooperation to the ICRC in their search for missing Kuwaiti and third-country nationals.
  • S/RES/686 (2 March 1991) demanded that Iraq release all Kuwaiti or third country nationals and return the remains of any deceased Kuwaiti and third country nationals so detained.
  • S/RES/661 (6 August 1990) imposed economic sanctions on Iraq after it invaded Kuwait, providing for a full trade embargo, excluding medical supplies, food and other items of humanitarian necessity, to be determined by a sanctions committee.

Presidential Statements

  • S/PRST/2010/27 (15 December 2010) welcomed Iraq's progress in meeting its nonproliferation and disarmament obligations, recognised Iraq's success in closing out remaining contracts in the Oil-for-Food programme and establishing successor arrangements for the DFI, and called on Iraq to quickly fulfill its remaining obligations to Kuwait.
  • S/PRST/2010/23 (12 November 2010) welcomed the Iraqi agreement to form a national partnership government.
  • S/PRST/2010/5 (26 February 2010) underlined the importance of Iraq’s ratifying the Additional Protocol to the Comprehensive Safeguards Agreement with the IAEA and expressed the Council's willingness to review disarmament-related restrictions on Iraq.
  • S/PRST/2009/30 (16 November 2009) reaffirmed support for UNAMI.
  • S/PRST/2009/17 (18 June 2009) reaffirmed Council support for the Iraqi government and UNAMI, in particular for helping the return of refugees, promoting dialogue and providing electoral assistance.
  • S/PRST/2007/36 (5 October 2007) condemned the 3 October attack in Baghdad against the Polish Ambassador to Iraq, which resulted in the wounding of the ambassador and the killing of one member of his personal security detachment team and one Iraqi civilian.
  • S/PRST/2007/11 (13 April 2007) condemned the terrorist attack that targeted the Iraqi Council of Representatives.
  • S/PRST/2006/29 (29 June 2006) condemned in the strongest possible terms the assassination by terrorists of the members of a Russian diplomatic mission in Iraq.
  • S/PRST/2006/24 (24 May 2006) welcomed the inauguration of the Iraqi government.
  • S/PRST/2006/8 (14 February 2006) welcomed the results of the elections.
  • S/PRST/2005/5 (16 February 2005) welcomed the elections and called for sustained political efforts to make the transition successful.
  • S/PRST/2004/11 (27 April 2004) supported the Special Adviser on Iraq.
  • S/PRST/2004/6 (24 March 2004) supported the decision to dispatch a Special Adviser and an assistance team for the elections.
  • S/PRST/2003/28 (18 December 2003) expressed the Council's continued support for Vorontsov's work, while announcing its intention to keep his mandate under review.
  • S/PRST/2003/24 (20 November 2003) emphasised the important humanitarian role of the oil-for-food program as the program ended.
  • S/PRST/2003/13 (20 August 2003) condemned the attack against the UN headquarters in Baghdad.

Press Statements

  • SC/10289 (22 June 2011) expressed the Council’s intention to continue funding for the activities of the high-level coordinator for missing Kuwaiti persons and property.
  • SC/10138 (21 December 2010) welcomed the formation of a new government in Iraq.
  • SC/10081 (10 November 2010) was on recent terrorist attacks targeting civilians in Iraq.
  • SC/9955 (15 June 2010) noted the Council agreed to extend the financing of the mandate of the high-level coordinator for six months.
  • SC/9943 (3 June 2010) was on Iraq's election certification.
  • SC/9897 (31 March 2010) welcomed the provisional results of the Iraqi election.
  • SC/9876 (8 March 2010) expressed appreciation to the government of Iraq and UNAMI for preparing and conducting the 7 March election.
  • SC/9810 (9 December 2009) condemned the 8 December coordinated bombings in Baghdad.
  • SC/9775 (26 October 2009) condemned the 25 October coordinated bombings in Baghdad.
  • SC/9772 (22 October 2009) noted the Council agreed to extend the financing of the mandate of the High-Level Coordinator for eight months.
  • SC/9733 (19 August 2009) condemned the 19 August coordinated bombings in Baghdad.
  • SC/9725 (7 August 2009) was the press statement on the adoption of resolution 1883.
  • SC/9643 (25 April 2009) was a press statement condemning terrorist attacks in Baghdad and Diyala on 23 and 24 April.
  • SC/9637 (16 April 2009) was a press statement regarding the issue of Iraq/Kuwait missing persons and property.
  • SC/9587 (3 February 2009) was a press statement on Iraq elections. 
  • SC/9529 (10 December 2008) was a press statement regarding the issue of Iraq/Kuwait missing persons and  property.
  • SC/9375 (25 June 2008) was a press statement regarding the issue of Iraq/Kuwait missing persons and  property.
  • SC/9358 (13 June 2008) expressed appreciation for UN assistance to Iraq, recognised efforts made by the Iraqi government to improve security, national reconciliation and reconstruction and to combat terrorism and sectarian violence, and called upon the international community to support Iraq.
  • SC/9194 (11 December 2007) on the issue of Iraq/Kuwait missing persons and missing property.
  • SC/9098 (16 August 2007) condemned the 14 August attacks in the Iraqi province of Ninawah.
  • SC/9035 (6 June 2007)
  • SC/8580 (14 December 2005) expressed the Council members' full support for High-Level Coordinator's continued efforts and welcomed the constructive engagement of the Government of Iraq.
  • SC/8481 (25 August 2005) expressed the Council members' full support for High-Level Coordinator's continued efforts. 

Secretary-General's Reports

  • S/2011/373 (20 June 2011) was the most recent report on Iraq/Kuwait missing persons and property.
  • S/2011/213 (31 March 2011) was on UNAMI.
  • S/2010/606 (26 November 2010) was on UNAMI.
  • S/2010/563 (1 November 2010) was on the DFI and the IAMB.
  • S/2010/406 (29 July 2010) was a report on UNAMI.
  • S/2010/359 (6 July 2010) was the most recent report on the DFI and the IAMB.
  • S/2010/300 (9 June 2010) was a report on Iraq/Kuwait missing persons and property.
  • S/2010/240 (14 May 2010) was a report on UNAMI.
  • S/2010/166 (1 April 2010) was a report on the DFI and the IAMB.
  • S/2010/76 (8 February 2010) was a report on UNAMI.
  • S/2009/585 (11 November 2009) was a report on UNAMI.
  • S/2009/539 (16 October 2009) was a report on Iraq/Kuwait missing persons and property.
  • S/2009/430 (24 August 2009) was a Secretary-General's report on the Development Fund for Iraq (DFI) and the International Advisory and Monitoring Board (IAMB).
  • S/2009/393 (30 July 2009) was a quarterly report on UNAMI.
  • S/2009/385 (27 July 2009) was the Secretary-General’s report on the review of Iraq resolutions.
  • S/2009/284 (2 June 2009) was a Secretary-General’s report on UNAMI.
  • S/2009/190 (8 April 2009) was a report of the Secretary-General on Iraq/Kuwait missing persons and missing property.
  • S/2009/102 (20 February 2009) was a report on UNAMI. 
  • S/2008/761 (4 December 2008) was a report from the Secretary-General on implementation of paragraph 14 of resolution 1284  on the repatriation of Kuwaiti and third-country nationals or their remains, and the return of property following the first Gulf War.
  • 2008/688 (6 November 2008) was a report on UNAMI.
  • S/2008/495 (29 July 2008) was a report on UNAMI.
  • S/2008/405 (19 June 2008) was a report from the Secretary-General on implementation of paragraph 14 of resolution 1284  on the repatriation of Kuwaiti and third-country nationals or their remains, and the return of property following the first Gulf War.
  • S/2008/372 (9 June 2008) provided a final account of the activities of UNMOVIC.
  • S/2008/266 (22 April 2008) was a report on UNAMI.
  • S/2008/175 (11 March 2008) was a note from the Secretary-General on the termination of the oil-for-food programme.
  • S/2008/19 (14 January 2008) was the briefing of the Council on UNAMI following the Secretary-General’s report.
  • S/2007/725 (7 December 2007) was a note from the Secretary-General on the termination of the oil-for-food programme, enclosing a proposal for the establishment of a Claims Settlement Committee.
  • S/2007/712 (6 December 2007) was the Secretary-General’s report pursuant to resolution 1284 on the Iraq/Kuwait missing persons and property issue.
  • S/2007/608 (15 October 2007) was a UNAMI report.
  • S/2007/568 (27 September 2007) reported on steps taken to dispose of the UNMOVIC archives.
  • S/2007/330(5 June 2007) was a UNAMI report.
  • S/2007/321 (31 May 2007) was the report on Iraq/Kuwait missing persons and missing property.
  • S/2007/314 (29 May 2007) was the UNMOVIC report.
  • S/2007/126 (7 March 2007) was a UNAMI report.
  • S/2007/106 (23 February 2007) was a UNMOVIC report.
  • S/2006/948 (6 December 2006) was a  report on Iraq/Kuwait missing persons/property pursuant to paragraph 14 of resolution 1284.
  • S/2006/945 (5 December 2006) was a UNAMI report.
  • S/2006/706 (1 September 2006) was a UNAMI report.
  • S/2006/701 (30 August 2006) was a UNMOVIC quarterly report.
  • S/2007/476 (25 July 2007) was a note from the Secretary-General on the termination of the oil-for-food programme.
  • S/2006/428 (21 June 2006) was a report on Iraq/Kuwait missing property.
  • S/2006/420 (21 June 2006) was the summary of the compendium of Iraq's proscribed WMD programmes.
  • S/2006/360 (2 June 2006) was a UNAMI report.
  • S/2006/342 (30 May 2006) was a UNMOVIC quarterly report.
  • S/2006/137 (3 March 2006) was a UNAMI report.
  • S/2006/133 (28 February 2006) was a UNMOVIC quarterly report.
  • S/2005/769 (8 December 2005) commended the new Iraqi authorities on their constructive cooperation.
  • S/2005/766 (7 December 2005) was a UNAMI report.
  • S/2005/585 (7 September 2005) was a UNAMI report.
  • S/2005/513 (8 August 2005) reported that the mortal remains of 227 Kuwaitis and other countries' nationals (six Saudi, one Lebanese, one Egyptian, one Omani, three Iranian and 12 stateless) had been identified.
  • S/2005/373 (7 June 2005) was a UNAMI report.
  • S/2005/141 and Corr.1 (7 March 2005) was a UNAMI report.
  • S/2004/959 (8 December 2004) was a UNAMI report.
  • S/2004/710 and Corr.1 (3 September 2004) was a UNAMI report.
  • S/2004/625 (5 Aug 2004) was a report pursuant to resolution 1483.
  • S/2003/1161 (9 December 2003) stated that more effort would be required before the questions of concern to Kuwait could be settled and proposed that the Council determine the future of  High-Level Coordinator's mandate in view of the request by Kuwait that it be continued.
  • S/2003/1149 (5 December 2003) was a report pursuant to resolution 1483.
  • S/2003/813 (13 August 2003) proposed that the Council might wish to consider bringing the High-Level Coordinator's mandate to a close by the end of 2003.
  • S/2003/715 (17 July 2003) was a report pursuant to resolution 1483, which established sanctions against the previous Iraqi government and envisaged the termination of the oil-for-food programme within six months.
  • S/2000/516 (1 June 2000) was the first UNMOVIC quarterly report.

Selected Letters

  • S/2010/666 (21 December 2010) outlined the Secretary-General’s intention to adjust the security arrangements for UNAMI in light of the withdrawal of US forces.
  • S/2010/625 (9 December 2010) was from Iraq requesting the Council extend the DFI and related immunities for a further and final six months.
  • S/2010/621 (9 December 2010) was the concept paper for the 15 December high level event on Iraq.
  • S/2010/619 (8 December 2010) was from the Secretary-General providing an update on the status of remaining letters of credit for the Oil-for-Food programme.
  • S/2010/618 (8 December 2010) was a note verbale from Iraq outlining progress it had made toward and requesting the lifting of disarmament and WMD-related restrictions.
  • S/2010/567 (28 October 2010) transmitted Iraq's third quarterly report on the DFI.
  • S/2010/403 (28 July 2010) was from Iraq to the Council outlining additional steps taken to comply with disarmament and nonproliferation obligations.
  • S/2010/378 (12 July 2010) informed the Secretariat that the Council had approved funding for the activities of the High-Level Coordinator for missing Kuwaiti persons and property until 31 December 2010.
  • S/2010/365 (18 June 2010) included Iraq's second quarterly report on the action plan and timeline for the transition to a post-DFI mechanism by 31 December 2010.
  • S/2010/150 (22 March 2010) included the IAEA assessment of Iraq's cooperation with its safeguards activities.
  • S/2010/153 (18 March 2010) included Iraq's first quarterly report on the action plan and timeline for the transition to a post-DFI mechanism by 31 December 2010.
  • S/2010/72 (4 February 2010) informed the Secretary-General that the Council had earmarked funds to finance the mandate of the High-Level Coordinator until 30 June 2010, and requested a comprehensive progress report by 30 June 2010.
  • S/2010/37 (19 January 2010) was Iraq's letter to the Council arguing that Iraq had fulfilled its disarmament obligations and asking for the removal of related restrictions under existing resolutions.
  • S/2009/685 (29 December 2009) noted the Council's agreement in SC/9772 to finance the activities of the High-Level Coordinator for Iraq/Kuwait Missing Persons and Property for a further eight months and suggested funds be transferred from the Iraq escrow account for this purpose.
  • S/2009/573 (3 November 2009) conveyed a 26 October 2009 letter from Iraq to the Secretary-General which reiterated the Iraqi request for a high-level international envoy to assess the extent of foreign involvement in attacks in Iraq.
  • S/2009/350 (8 July 2009) was a letter from Iraq informing the Security Council that 24 boxes of property belonging to the Kuwait Central Bank had been returned to Kuwait on 24 June.
  • S/2009/226 (30 April 2009) was a letter from the UNCC welcoming the willingness of Iraq and Kuwait to discuss unpaid compensations on 20 May 2009.
  • S/2009/203 (14 April 2009) was a letter from Kuwait to the President of the Security Council expressing support for the Secretary-General's proposal to extend the mandate of the High-level Coordinator to June 2010. 
  • S/2009/190 (8 April 2009) was a comprehensive report on the repatriation or return of all Kuwaiti and third-country nationals or their remains and the return of all Kuwaiti property. 
  • S/2009/178 (24 March 2009) was a letter from the Deputy Prime Minister of Kuwait to the President of the Security Council concerning paragraph 5 of resolution 1859.
  • S/2009/143 (13 March 2009) was a letter from the Iraqi Foreign Minister to the Council regarding paragraph 5 of resolution 1859.
  • S/2009/79 (3 February 2009) transmitted the annual report of the 1518 Committee.
  • S/2008/783 (12 December 2008) Secretary-General informed the Council of his intention to conclude a detailed agreement with the US government to ensure US forces in Iraq continue to provide security support to the UN in Iraq.  S/2008/784 (16 December 2008) is a letter from the Council noting the Secretary-General's intention. 
  • S/2008/676 (28 October 2008) was a letter from the Syrian Arab Republic Ambassador to the President of the Security Council and the Secretary-General condeming the US targeting of a civilian building inside Syrian territory by four US helicopters which resulted in the loss of life of eight Syrians.
  • S/2008/423 (27 June 2008) was a letter from the Council to the Secretary-General supporting the actions and recommendations contained in the Secretary-General's report on the final activities of UNMOVIC (S/2008/372) regarding the disposition of and control of access to UNMOVIC's archives.
  • S/2008/380 (10 June 2008) was a letter from Iraq emphasising that Iraq still needed the assistance and support of the MNF-I and noting that Iraq is currently negotiating bilateral security arrangements with the US that would address Iraq’s security needs; these arrangements are currently covered by the mandate of the MNF-I.
  • S/2008/350 (29 May 2008) was a letter from Iraq on the fulfilment of its obligations under resolution 1762 to adhere to disarmament and non-proliferation regimes, including in particular by making arrangements to join the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons and to sign the Additional Protocol to the IAEA Safeguards Agreements, and by acceding to the Chemical Weapons Convention.
  • S/2008/341 (23 May 2008) was a letter from the Council requesting that  the Iraqi-UN Working Group on outstanding issues relating to the oil-for-food programme reconvene in June 2008 and affirmed its intention to conclude in July 2008 all outstanding issues and end the oil-for-food programme.
  • S/2008/318 (9 May 2008)  was a letter from the Secretary-General  to the Council reporting on the Iraqi-UN Working Group on outstanding issues relating to the oil-for-food programme, in particular issues arising from suppliers’ claims that goods were delivered to Iraq but have not been paid for because of a lack of authentication documents.
  • S/2008/321 (8 May 2008) was a letter from Syria rejecting US accusations of weapons and fighters’ flow from Syria to Iraq.
  • S/2008/280 (28 April 2008) was a letter from Iran rejecting US accusations that Iran is contributing to insecurity in Iraq via arming, training and funding illegal armed groups in Iraq.
  • S/2008/238 (8 April 2008) and S/2008/239 (11 April 2008) was an exchange of letters between the Secretary-General and the Council on the appointment of Ambassador Gennady Tarasov of Russia as the new High-Level Coordinator for Iraq/Kuwait missing persons and property.
  • S/2008/206 (26 March 2008) was a letter from the Council to the Secretary-General allowing the amount of $225,000 be earmarked from the operating reserves of the Iraq escrow account to cover the next 12 months of the activities of the High-level Coordinator for Iraq/Kuwait missing persons and property (starting from the new appointment) and requesting a comprehensive report in 12 months providing a timescale for completion of the mandate under resolution 1284.
  • S/2008/205 (11 March 2008) was a letter from the Secretary-General to the Council noting that projections of future financial requirements for the continuation of the activities of the High-level Coordinator for Iraq/Kuwait missing persons and property exceed the current allotted funds in the Iraq escrow account, and therefore proposing that an amount of $900,000 covering activities for the next four years be used from the operational reserves of the account.  
  • S/2008/140 (29 February 2008) was a letter from the Council requesting the Secretary-General for a further progress report on the termination of the oil-for-food programme, by 15 March.
  • S/2008/41 (23 January 2008) was a letter from the Secretary-General enclosing a summary of the Working Group meeting outlining progress made with respect to the termination of operations relating to letters of credit issued in the framework of the oil-for-food programme.
  • S/2007/680 (21 November 2007) was a letter approving the archiving procedure for the UNMOVIC files proposed by the Secretary-General in his September 2007 report (S/2007/568).
  • S/2007/661 (8 November 2007) was a letter by the Council requesting the Secretary-General to develop proposals to address unresolved issues, including the possible need for the establishment of mechanisms to deal with outstanding issues, and to report again to the Council on such issues within three weeks, bearing in mind the non-negotiable termination date of 31 December 2007 for the programme.
  • S/2007/657 (7 November 2007) was a letter from the Governing Council of the UNCC declining the Iraqi request to reduce its level of contribution to the Compensation Fund.
  • S/2007/579 (17 September 2007) was a letter from the Council to Iraq noting the position of the Iraqi government in S/2007/526 and reiterating that the matter was being reviewed by the UNCC Governing Council.
  • S/2007/526 (5 September 2007) was a letter from Iraq to the Council requesting a temporary suspension of the obligation to pay compensations with a view to reducing the payments.
  • S/2007/481 (9 August 2007) was a letter from Iraq to the Secretary-General expressing the desire to have the UNAMI mandate extended for one more year.
  • S/2007/398 (3 July 2007) was a letter from the Governing Council of the UNCC to the Security Council on its session held from 20 to 22 June 2007.
  • S/2007/412 (25 June 2007) and S/2007/413 (6 July 2007) was the exchange of letters between the Secretary-General and the Council on the construction of a new UN compound in Baghdad.
  • S/2007/300 and S/2007/301 (7 May 2007) was the exchange of letters on the transfer of money from the UNMOVIC account to settle Iraq's arrears to the UN.
  • S/2007/274 (8 May 2007) was the letter from Egypt enclosing the statement of the Sharm el-Sheikh meeting.
  • S/2007/242 (27 April 2007)
  • S/2007/241 (27 March 2007)
  • S/2007/236 (24 April 2007) was the letter from Iraq requesting the conclusion of the mandate of UNMOVIC and the IAEA Iraq action team.
  • S/2007/224 (20 April 2007) was the letter from Iraq enclosing a summary of the 10 March Baghdad conference.
  • S/2007/218 (19 April 2007) and S/2007/245 (30 April 2007) was the exchange of letters between the Secretary-General and the president of the Council on a letter from the IAEA Director-General noting that the IAEA had not been able to implement its mandate in Iraq.
  • S/2007/184 (31 March 2007) was the letter from Iran complaining about the firing of shots by the British military forces at the Iranian Consulate General in Iraq.
  • S/2006/987 and S/2006/988 (15 December 2006) was an exchange of letters between the Secretary-General and the Council on an Iraqi request to transfer $40 million from the UNMOVIC account to the Permanent Mission of Iraq to the UN.
  • S/2007/47 (29 January 2007)
  • S/2007/46 (8 December 2006)
  • S/2006/963 (7 December 2006) was a letter from League of Arab States enclosing a statement by the Ministerial Committee on Iraq.
  • S/2006/899 (17 November 2006) was the letter from the US on the extension of the MNF mandate.
  • S/2006/888 (14 November 2006) was the letter from the Iraqi government requesting a renewal of the MNF, Development Fund for Iraq and International Advisory and Monitoring Board for Iraq mandates.
  • S/2006/646 (11 August 2006)
  • S/2006/614 (1 August 2006) was a letter from the Arab League including the outcome of the meeting of the Preparatory Committee for the Iraqi National Reconciliation Conference.
  • S/2006/512 (12 July 2006) was a letter from Russia including the decision and the statement of the State Duma of the Russian Federal Assembly in connection with the killing of Russian citizens in Iraq.
  • S/2006/510 (10 July 2006)
  • S/2006/505 (11 July 2006) was a letter from Iran to the Secretary-General enclosing the final communiqué of the ninth meeting of foreign ministers of Iraq's neighbouring countries.
  • S/2006/449 (28 June 2006) was a letter from Honduras to the Secretary-General enclosing a communiqué regarding the elections of the new government of Iraq.
  • S/2006/394 (14 June 2006) was a letter from the Secretary-General to the president of the Council enclosing a letter from his representative on the IAMB.
  • S/2006/377 (9 June 2006) was a letter from Iraq to the president of the Council requesting the prolongation of the MNF mandate and of the DFI and the IAMB.
  • S/2006/221 (5 April 2006) was the letter from Tunisia on the return to Kuwait of Kuwaiti property.
  • S/2006/93 and S/2006/94 (10 February 2006) were letters on UNMOVIC.
  • S/2005/807 (19 December 2005)
  • S/2005/753 (5 December 2005) was a letter from Turkey asking for more UN involvement in Iraq.
  • A/60/235 (22 November 2005) was a letter from Costa Rica to the President of the General Assembly requesting the General Assembly to follow-up on the recommendations of the Inquiry Committee into the oil-for-food programme.
  • S/2005/713 (11 November 2005)
  • S/2005/687 (11 November 2005) was a letter from Iraq asking for a 12 month extension of the MNF mandate and the DFI.
  • S/2005/691 (31 October 2005) letter from the US on the extension of the MNF mandate.
  • S/2005/656 (17 October 2005)
  • S/2005/652 (17 October 2005) was a letter on the IAEA activities in Iraq.
  • S/2005/536 (19 August 2005)
  • S/2005/535 (8 August 2005)
  • S/2005/509 (4 August 2005) the Secretary-General recommended that the Council extend UNAMI's mandate by 12 months.
  • A/59/824-S/2005/363  (31 May 2005) was a letter from Bahrain to the Secretary-General which transmitted the Joint Communiqué of the Ministerial Meeting between the Gulf Cooperation Council states and the EU, expressing appreciation to ICRC and the Tripartite Commission for seeking Kuwaiti and third-country nationals and missing persons whose fate and whereabouts were still unknown.
  • S/2004/764 (30 September 2004) was a letter on the security arrangements for UNAMI.
  • S/2003/538 (8 May 2003) was a letter from the US and the UK with the Coalition's statement of purpose.
  • S/2002/112 (14 February 2000) appointed High-Level Coordinator Yuli M. Vorontsov.

Other Documents

  • S/PV.6511 (8 April 2011) was on UNAMI.
  • S/PV.6450 (15 December 2010) was the high level meeting on Iraq.
  • S/PV.6418 (10 November 2010) was a briefing on the DFI and the IAMB.
  • SC/10081 (10 November 2010) was a press statement on terrorist attacks targeting civilians in Iraq.
  • S/PV.6368 (4 August 2010) was a briefing on UNAMI.
  • S/PV.6356 and S/PV.6357 (12 July 2010) was a briefing on the DFI and the IAMB.
  • S/PV.6320 (25 May 2010) was a briefing on UNAMI.  
  • S/PV.6293 (6 April 2010) was a briefing on DFI and IAMB.
  • S/PV.6271 (16 February 2010) was a briefing on UNAMI.
  • S/PV.6249 (21 December 2009) was the meeting record of the adoption of resolution 1905.
  • S/PV.6218 and S/PV.6219 (16 November 2009) encompass a briefing on UNAMI.
  • PR/2009/5 (29 October 2009) was the press release by the UNCC announcing that it will pay $610 million to 10 further claimants.
  • S/PV.6179 (7 August 2009) was the meeting in which the Council unanimously extended the mandate of the UNAMI for another year.
  • S/PV.6177 (4 August 2009) was a briefing by Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Iraq and head of UNAMI, Ad Melkert.
  • S/PV.6145 (18 June 2009) was a debate featuring a briefing by the Secretary-General’s Special Representative in Iraq, Staffan de Mistura.
  • The 14th report on the human rights situation in the country covering the period 1 July to 31 Decmber 2008 was released on 29 April.
  • S/PV.6087 (26 February 2009) was an open debate during which the Council was briefed by SRSG Staffan de Mistura on UNAMI's activities.
  • S/PV.6059 (22 December 2008) was an open meeting on Iraq during which Iraq Foreign Minister Hoshyar Zebari addressed the Council.  Resolution 1859 was adopted. 
  • The 13th report on the human rights situation in the country covering the period 1 January – 30 June 2008 was released on 2 December 2008.
  • S/PV.6016 (14 November 2008) an open debate during which the Council was briefed by SRSG Staffan de Mistura on UNAMI's activities. 
  • PR/2008/10 (29 October 2008) was the press relase by the UNCC announcing that it will pay $889 million to 16 further claimants.
  • S/PV.5949 (6 August 2008) an open debate during which the Council was briefed by Under Secretary-General B. Lynn Pascoe on the report on UNAMI’s activities (S/2008/495).  
  • S/PV.5910 (13 June 2008) was a briefing from the US on behalf of the MNF-I, from Ibrahim Gambari, Special Adviser on the International Compact with Iraq, on UNAMI activities, and from Warren Sach, Assistant Secretary-General, Controller, on the International Advisory and Monitoring Board (IAMB).
  • S/PV.5878 (28 April 2008) was a briefing  by Under Secretary-General for Political Affairs B. Lynn Pascoe on progress regarding the fulfilliment of UNAMI's mandate and by US Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad on behalf of the Mulltinational Force in Iraq.
  • S/PV.5823 (21 January 2008) was a Security Council briefing and debate on Iraq.
  • SG/SM/11256 (5 November 2007) was the Secretary-General’s remarks at the Istanbul meeting of Iraq’s neighbouring countries.
  • S/PV.5763 (19 October 2007) was the latest US briefing on the activities of the MNF-I.
  • S/PV.5710 (29 June 2007) was the official record of the Council’s meeting that terminated the UNMOVIC mandate.
  • S/2006/672 (21 August 2006) was a report from the Board of Auditors on the UN Iraq Escrow Account for the financial year ended 31 December 2004.
  • S/AC.44/2004/(02)/116/Add.1 (10 February 2006) was the second report to the terrorism and weapons of mass destruction committee (1540 committee) on steps taken to implement resolution 1540.
  • S/AC.44/2004/(02)/116 (18 April 2005 ) was the first report to the terrorism and weapons of mass destruction committee (1540 committee) on steps taken to implement resolution 1540. The report lists relevant treaties, conventions and protocols to which Iraq is currently a party or to which it is planning to accede to.
  • S/2002/1034 (16 September 2002) was the letter from Iraq permitting the entry of UNMOVIC weapons inspectors to the country without conditions.
  • S/2000/321 (17 April 2000) was the letter from the Russian delegation criticising UNMOVIC's organisational plan for not clearly prescribing procedures for conducting inspections, and for failing to mention the need to reach an agreement on these procedures with Baghdad.
  • S/2000/311 (13 April 2000) Council approval of Organisational Plan.
  • S/2000/292 (6 April 2000) was the UNMOVIC Organisational Plan.
  • S/2000/207 (10 March 2000) was the Secretary-General's appointment of the College of Commissioners.
  • S/2000/61 (27 January 2000) was the Council approval of the nomination of the Executive Chairman.
  • S/2000/60 (27 January 2000) was the Secretary-General's nomination of the Executive Chairman.
  • S/PV.4084 (17 December 1999) was the meeting record from the Council's adoption of resolution 1284 (with China, France, Malaysia and Russia abstaining).
  • S/25811 (21 May 1993) and Add.1 (21 May 1993) was the report on the demarcation by the UN Iraq-Kuwait Boundary Demarcation Commission.


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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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Mark Aldrich,
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